My Weiss, Fried, Propheter, and Related Ancestors from Klingenmünster, Germany

My great-grandparents George Pendleton Armstrong and Alice Elizabeth Nutick.

Pictured above are my great-grandparents George Pendleton Armstrong and Alice Elizabeth Nutick. He was the son of Bradford Carroll Armstrong and Martha A. Knight Lyons. His family, for the most part, have been in the United States a long time. Almost all of his lines are found living in Colonial America. I have a multitude of interesting ancestors on his side that I will be writing blog entries about in the future. However, she was the daughter of two German immigrants Elias “Eli” Nutick and Margaret (Margarethe) Weiss.

Margaret/Margreth (Margarethe) Weiss came from Germany to the USA in 1865 with her parents and at least some of her siblings. The family settled in Hamilton County, Ohio.

Elias Nutick and Margaret (Margarethe) Weiss were married on 3 March 1870 in Hamilton County, Ohio.

Four of the Nutick children in front of their home in Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio.

Children born to Elias “Eli” Nutick and Margarethe Weiss:

  1. Valentine Nutick born 11 Apr 1868 in Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, he died 15 May 1919 Madisonville, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. He never married.
  2. Alice Elizabeth Nutick born March 1871 in Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, she died 28 August 1949 in Seattle, King County, Washington. She married 22 June 1889 in Hamilton County, Ohio to George Pendleton Armstrong (son of Bradford Carroll Armstrong and Martha A. Knight Lyons). – My direct ancestors.
  3. Carrie Nutick born 8 July 1873 in Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, and she died 17 October 1952 in Indian Hill, Hamilton County, Ohio. She married 1892 in Hamilton County, Ohio to David Newton Muchmore.
  4. George Jacob Nutick born 22 November 1875 in Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, he died 1946 in Washington, D.C. He married Anna Louise Wein.
  5. Emma Mae Nutick born 12 September 1880 in Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, she died 27 May 1946 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. She married in Cincinnati, Ohio to Frank John Huddleston.
  6. Charles Nutick born 26 June 1883 in Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, he died 22 June 1913 at the Tuberculosis Hospital in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. He never married.
  7. Harry Henry Nutick born 10 June 1885 in Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, he died 29 November 1961 in Mason, Warren County, Ohio. He married Lillian Myrtle Armstrong on 5 February 1906 in Hamilton County, Ohio. Lillian was the daughter of Ennis Turpin Armstrong and Marelda Elsa “Elma” Stevens. Lillian and George Pendleton Armstrong (husband of Alice Elizabeth Nutick) were 1st cousins. Creating a double connection between the children of the two couples.

A few explanations as to why their first-born Valentine Nutick was born prior to their marriage. One option is that his year of birth is incorrect. But he is listed as aged 1 year in the 1870 Census. His father may have been married prior and Margaret Weiss was his stepmother that raised him from the time he was a baby. It appears that Eli was much older than Margaret, so it’s quite possible he was married prior, but I have found no other marriage record for him. On Valentine’s death certificate his parents are listed as Eli Nutick and Margaret Weiss. The informant was his sister-in-law. Valentine never married and has no descendants, so DNA is of no help in this situation. Also, most (but not all) of the marriage records for this time period in Hamilton County, Ohio were destroyed by fire. People were asked to re-register their marriage record, this was done by the groom or bride or the person that married them. Also, some records were re-created by using marriage announcements from the newspaper. So, it is possible they really married a few years prior to 1870.

Carrie Nutick Muchmore with her children: Blanche M., Florence Margaret, Wilbur Newton, Blanche M., and Mabel A. Muchmore.

To learn more about Elias “Eli” Nutick, his real surname, his parentage and the mystery solved regarding his homeland, please see my recent blog post: 52 Ancestors, Week 15. How Do You Spell That? My 2nd Great-Grandfather Elias “Eli” Nutick.

Looking down at Klingenmünster from Burg Landeck, the castle atop a hill. (Source: Shutterstock / Leonid Andronov)

Margaret (Margarethe) Weiss was born 23 June 1846 in Klingenmünster, Südliche Weinstraße (Southwest Wine Route), Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. Her baptism record of 28 June 1846 is found in the nearby parish of Heuchelheim-Klingen. She died 31 December 1919 in Madisonville, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Henry (Heinrich) Weiss and Margaretha Maria (Mary) Fried.

Klingenmunster is found within the Southwest Wine Route district in Germany. It is near the border with France. Its current population is about 2,200 people.

Henry (Heinrich) Weiss was born about 1808 in Klingenmünster, Germany, and died 8 September 1873 in Ohio. He was the son of Georg Peter Weiss and Juliana Kaiser. The Weiss, Kaiser and related families have a long history of living in Klingenmünster for several generations. I have several Weiss DNA matches.

Georg Peter Weiss was born 22 February 1790 in Klingenmünster and baptized 23 February 1790 in the Klingenmünster church parish. His parents are listed as Heinrich Weiss (II) and Catharina Weiss.

Heinrich Weiss II was born in Klingenmünster and was the son of Heinrich Weiss I.

Heinrich Weiss I was born about 1730 in Klingenmünster and died in Klingenmünster. I believe he may have been the son of Hanss Jacob Wessa/Weiss/Weisse and Anna Christina Hoffman. I have DNA links to Wessa/Weiss in Dannstadt-Schauernheim, but you have to go way back to make this connection. Dannstadt-Schauernheim is 30 miles from Klingenmünster. But I also have a DNA match to a woman who’s paternal grandparents were both born in Germany. Her paternal grandfather’s surname was Wessa and he was born in Klingenmünster. I have to go back to my 7th great-grandfather before the name may have been been spelled Wessa. All church records in Klingenmünster and nearby parishes where my ancestors are found, the name was spelled Weiss. It appears there is a DNA link between the Wessa family of Dannstadt-Schauernheim that some branches of the family lived in Klingenmünster and my Weiss family from Klingenmünster.

Juliana Kaiser was born 11 February 1777 in Klingenmünster and baptized 12 February 1777 in the Klingenmünster church parish. She died 16 April 1830 in Klingenmünster. Her parents are listed in her baptism record as Jacob Kaÿser and Maria Elisabetha Kaÿser.

Jacob Kaiser/Kaÿser was the son of Heinrich Kaÿser and Anna Barbara Weiss. Both were born in Klingenmünster.

Heinrich Kaÿser was born in Klingenmünster. He married first to Anna Barbara Weiss and they had four children: Jacob Kaÿser/Kaiser, Juliana Kaiser, Anna Kristina Kaiser, and Anna Elisabetha Kaiser. He married second to Anna Barbara Fried and had one child: Maria Elisabeth Kaiser.

Anna Barbara Weiss Kaÿser was a sibling of Heinrich Weiss I, meaning I have a double Weiss DNA connection.

Anna Barbara Fried, the second wife of Heinrich Kaÿser, is also related to me. She is my 2nd cousin 6x removed and is related to my Fried ancestors.

Meaning of the surname Weiss, “Weiss or Weiß, also written Weis or Weisz, pronounced like “vice”, is a German surname, meaning ‘white’ in both Germa It comes from Middle High German wîz (white, blonde) and Old High German (h)wīz (white, bright, shining).” (3)

Kayser is a surname derived from the German imperial title Kaiser (English: emperor). The title Kaiser is in turn derived from the Latin title Caesar, which again is a derivation from the personal name of a branch of the gens (clan) Julia, to which belonged Gaius Julius Caesar, the forebear of the first Roman imperial family. The further etymology is unclear.

Other names with the same origin are Kaiser and Keiser, and Kiser; Keyser is more common as a Dutch spelling, Kiser is more common in Sweden and the United States, and Qaisar is an Arabic version.” (4)

“Hoffman is a surname of German origin. The original meaning in medieval times was “steward, i.e. one who manages the property of another”.  (5)

Margaretha Maria (Mary) Fried Weiss was born 25 April 1819 in Klingenmünster and her baptism record of 28 April 1819 is found in the nearby parish of Heuchelheim-Klingen. She died after 1881 in Hamilton County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Johann Georg Fried and Margaretha Propheter.

Heuchelheim-Klingen. Currently, around 800 people live in Heuchelheim-Klingen. It is 2 miles from Klingenmunster.

The surname Fried is pronounced Freedt and sounds similar to the English word Freed. Fried is almost always a Jewish surname, but in the case of my family that are found in the Lutheran church records in Klingenmünster and nearby parishes, it most likely was actually Freed which is a German surname from a short form of the personal name Friedrich.

Johann Georg Fried was born 24 May 1796 in Klingenmünster and his baptism record of 25 May 1796 is found in the nearby parish of Heuchelheim-Klingen. He died after 1881 in Hamilton County, Ohio. He married 12 September 1820 in the nearby parish of Bad Bergzabern to Margretha Propheter. He was the son of Johannes (Johannes Adam) Fried and Anna Barbara Ohl.

Johannes (Johannes Adam) Fried was born 28 October 1747 in Klingenmünster, Südliche Weinstraße, Germany, and died 9 December 1808 in Klingenmünster, Südliche Weinstraße, Germany. He was the son of Johannes Friedrich Fried and Anna Kristina (Anastasia Christina) Sartor.

Johannes Friedrich Fried was born about 1716 in Edenkoben, Südliche Weinstraße, Germany, and died before 1786 in Klingenmünster, Südliche Weinstraße, Germany. He was the son of Johannes Balthasar Fried and Anna Juliana ____.

The distance between Edenkoben and Klingenmünster is about 14 miles.

Anna Kristina (Anastasia Christina) Sartor was born about 1725 in Edenkoben, Südliche Weinstraße, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, and died 30 December 1786 in Klingenmunster, Südliche Weinstraße, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. She was the daughter of Johann Valentin Sartor and Maria Agnes Barth.

Johann Valentin Sartor was born June 1686 in Edenkoben, Südliche Weinstraße, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. He was the son of Johannes Sartor and Anna Margretha Acker.

Maria Agnes Barth was baptized 27 May 1688 in Edenkoben, Südliche Weinstraße, Germany. She was the daughter of Hanss Jacob Barth and Anna Catharina Gleich.

Anna Barbara Ohl was born 27 November 1744 in Klingenmünster, Südliche Weinstraße, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, and died 17 October 1819 in Klingenmünster, Südliche Weinstraße, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. She was the daughter of Daniel Ohl and Anna Maria ____.

Daniel Ohl was born 29 October 1711 in Klingenmunster, Südliche Weinstraße, Germany, and died about 1750 in Klingenmunster, Südliche Weinstraße, Germany. He was the son of Johannes (Hanß) Georg Öhl and Margaretha ____.

Back to Margaretha Propheter, wife of Johann Georg Fried.

Margaretha Propheter was born about 1802 in Klingenmünster and died before 1880. She was the daughter of Johann Jacob Propheter and Anna Margretha Weinmann.

Evangelical Reformed Lutheran Church records of my Propheter, Weinmann and other ancestors going further back LeBeau/Le Brea, Först/Fuerst, and Grosshans are found in Klingenmünster and in nearby parishes of Kapellen-Drusweiler, Bad Bergzabern, and Heuchelheim-Klingen, and my Sartor, Barth, Acker, and Gleich ancestors are found in the nearby parish of Edenkoben.

The furthest I can take the Propheter line back with church records is to my sixth great-grandfather Johannes Adam Propheter born 16 January 1742 in Barbelroth, which is 6 miles (9.6 km) from Klingenmünster. His birth record is found in the parish of Barbelroth and lists his parents as Philipp Jacob Propheter and Maria Elisabetha Scherer. He died 3 March 1815 in Bad Bergzabern. He married 16 August 1763 in the parish of Kapellen-Drusweiler to Katharina Elisabebetha LeBeau/Le Beau.

Katharina Elisabetha LeBeau was born 31 March 1743 in Kapellen-Drusweiler and baptized 3 April 1743 in the Kapellen-Drusweiler parish. She died before 1778 in Kapellen-Drusweiler. She was the daughter of Johann Georg Jacob LeBeau and Maria Juliana Först/Fuerst.

Meanings and origins of the German surnames of my ancestors discussed in this blog entry:

I have not been able to discover any information about the meaning or history of the Propheter surname in Germany.

This surname of Ohl was a German occupational name for an extractor of linseed oil. The oil was extracted from linseed by striking the grains with a heavy wooden hammer. The name was derived from the Old German OLI (oil) and SLAHEN (strike). (6)

Weinmann, this unusual name is of German origin and is a metonymic occupational name for someone who produced and or sold wine. The derivation is from the medieval German “win”, in modern German “wein”, meaning “wine” or “vine”, with “mann”, man. (7)

Grosshans is a German surname a compound name from Middle High German groz ‘large’ + Hans, a pet form of the personal name Johann(e)s (see John), hence a nickname used to denote a large man called Hans or to distinguish between two bearers of this personal name. (8)

Scherer is a German occupational name for a sheep-shearer or someone who used scissors to trim the surface of finished cloth and remove excessive nap, from German Scherer, agent derivatives of Middle High German scheren ‘to shear’. (9)

LeBeau / Le Beau is a surname of French origin and is a nickname for a handsome man (perhaps also ironically for an ugly one), from Old French beu, bel ‘fair’, ‘lovely’ (Late Latin bellus), with the definite article le. Compare Beau, Lebel. (10) My LeBeau / Le Beau ancestors lived in an area of Germany very close to the border with France, and it appears their roots going further back would be in France.

Först is a German surname and is a shortened form of Foerster or Förstner. The name Foerster is an occupational hereditary surname, a type of surname that was taken from a word describing or common to the profession of the original bearer. It is a name for a person whose occupation is forestry, or a person who lives near a forest. (11)

The German surname Sartor is humanistic name and is a variant of Sartorius meaning Tailor. From the Latin Sartor. (12)

The surname Barth is a German and Swiss German surname and is a nickname for a bearded man from the Middle High German Bart ‘Beard’. (13)

Acker is a Dutch and German surname and is a topographic name from Middle High German and Middle Dutch Acker meaning ‘a (Cultivated) Field’, hence it is a byname for a peasant. (14)

Gleich is a word which means ‘equal’, ‘same’, or ‘very similar’ in the German language. One site states that the surname Gleich was a German nickname for an individual considered fortunate, perhaps someone who had had a narrow escape. The word was derived from the Old German GLUCK (meaning luck) of uncertain origin, and not found before the 12th century. (15)

The village of Barbelroth in the Südliche Weinstraße (Southwest Wine Route), Germany.

A little information about Barbelroth:

“Half-timbered village in the Bergzaberner Land

The 650-soul community of Barbelroth is located one kilometre east of Bad Bergzabern. Here you can still experience real South Palatinate charm, which is not to be found anywhere else in the world. Half-timbered houses characterize the village and give the village in the Bad Bergzaberner Land its very special character – like its inhabitants, who radiate peace and serenity.” (1)

Back to my fourth great-grandparents. The marriage of Johann Georg Fried and Margaretha Propheter is recorded 12 September 1820 but the baptism record of their daughter Margretha Maria Fried is recorded 28 April 1819. Both are found in the Evangelical Reformed Lutheran church records of the parish of Heuchelheim-Klingen. It appears there may be a dating error of the year in one of both of the records, since it puts her birth at 17 months before their marriage. I have been unable to view the actual church records and what is available is the transcribed text by others, so it may actually be an error made when the records were transcribed. But they are listed as her parents in the baptism record. Also there is very strong DNA evidence linking me and other descendants to these Fried and Propheter families. I have many Fried DNA matches in the USA, and Propheter DNA matches in the USA and Germany.

Known children of Johann Georg Fried and Margaretha Propheter:

  1. Margretha Maria (Mary) Fried born 25 April 1819 in Klingenmünster and died after 1881 in Hamilton County, Ohio. She married Henry (Heinrich) Weiss. (My direct ancestors).
  2. Frederick (Friedrich Jacob) Fried born 2 February 1824 in Klingenmünster and died July 1889 in New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana. He married Anna Maria (Mary Ann) Weis. (I am a DNA match to descendants of this couple).
  3. Jacob Fried born 10 July 1834 in Klingenmunster and died 17 March 1924 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. He married 1st to Alice ____ about 1872 in Hamilton County, Ohio. He married second on 3 December 1892 to Mary (Marie) Ziegler.
  4. George Jacob Fried born 16 March 1837 in Heuchelheim-Klingen and died 3 November 1898 in Ohio. He married 5 January 1862 in Hamilton County, Ohio to Katherina Weis. (I have DNA matches that are descendants of this couple).
  5. Barbara Fried born 23 April 1838 in Bad Bergzabern and she died 20 June 1926 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. She married 1st to Valentine John Miller and 2nd to ____ Renschler. (I have a DNA connection to descendants of her and her husband Valentine John Miller).

As you can see most of the Fried siblings came to Cincinnati, Ohio. One brother went to New Orleans, Louisiana. Some of our Propheter kin also came to Cincinnati, Ohio.

Kapellen-Drusweiler. The village of Kapellen-Drusweiler has a population of about 936 people.

A little information about the village of Kapellen-Drusweiler which is 4 miles from Klingenmünster:

The wine village Kapellen-Drusweiler in the district of Südliche Weinstraße belongs to the municipality of Bad Bergzabern and lies between the Palatinate Forest Biosphere Reserve and the Rhine. 1800 hours of sunshine spoil this particularly favorable spot on the “Southern Wine Route”. Despite its proximity to the spa town of Bad Bergzabern, Kapellen-Drusweiler has retained a quiet, village character. On a well-developed cycle path or hiking trail you can be in a few minutes in the old town centre of Bad Bergzabern. Spas and parks, restaurants, shops and a variety of leisure activities invite you to linger. The district town of Landau, an old garrison fortress with listed buildings, is also just a few minutes’ drive away. A special feature of Kapellen-Drusweiler is the Rosengarten hiking trail in the vineyards south of the village, which clearly shapes the townscape and sets an event highlight in the region with the annual rose hike – a wine hike with tasting in the vineyards.” (2)

Known children of my 3rd great grandparents Henry (Heinrich) Weiss and Margaretha Maria (Mary) Fried:

  1. Margaret (Margrethe) Weiss born 23 June 1846 in Klingenmünster. Her baptism record of 28 June 1846 is found in the parish of Heuchelheim-Klingen. She died 31 December 1919 in Madisonville, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. She married Elias “Eli” Nutick in Hamilton County, Ohio. (My great-great grandparents)
  2. Henry Weiss born about 1847 in Klingenmünster and died before 1920 in Ohio. He married 22 February 1893 in Hamilton County, Ohio to Bertha Henrich.
  3. Valentine Weiss born about 1847 in Klingenmünster and died before 1870 in Ohio.
  4. Charlotta Weiss born 4 June 1848 in Klingenmünster and baptized 9 June 1848 in the Klingenmünster church parish.
  5. Barbara Weiss born 5 May 1849 in Klingenmünster and baptized 13 May 1849 in the Klingenmünster church parish.
  6. Katharina Weiss born 16 April 1851 in Klingenmünster and baptized 21 April 1851 in Klingenmünster church parish. She remained in Germany and married John Siebold. They had at least one child, a daughter Anna Siebold.

Nothing is known about Charlotta and Barbara Weiss other than their baptism records being found in Klingenmunster. So far I have not found any marriage records for them in Germany or the USA and I have not found any descendants or DNA matches related to them. They may have died young.

Katharina Weiss stayed in Klingenmunter and married John Siebold. They had one confirmed child, a daughter, Anna Siebold.

The daughter Anna Siebold was born September 1874 in Klingenmunster and died 24 November 1933 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio . She states in US Federal Census records that she came to the USA in 1882, 1884, and 1890. If she came in 1882 or 1884, as a child, I assume her parents may have also come to the USA. But if she came in 1890 at the age of 16 years old, she could have come alone. She would have migrated to Cincinnati because she had family there already.

Anna Siebold married first to George Retsch on 23 November 1898 in Hamilton County, Ohio and married second to Thomas Leicht on 11 September 1909 in Hamilton County, Ohio.

She only had one child with first husband George Retsch. They had a son named Harry George Retsch born 25 November 1900 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, and died 22 August 1962 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio. He married 20 Sep 1924 in Hamilton County, Ohio to Edna Pearce. Sadly his wife died quite suddenly 10 months later. He married second in 1939 to in Massie Bebe Stevens, a 38-year-old nurse at the St. Joseph Maternity Hospital and Infant Asylum in Cincinnati, Ohio.

There were no children born of the first marriage, and his second wife Massie was 39 in the 1940 Census and at that time no children were born from this second marriage either. There are several people related to her that list her in their trees and they list no children for her.

So the only known descendants today for Henry (Heinrich) Weiss and Margaretha Maria (Mary) Fried are through the line of my great-great grandmother Margaret (Margarthe) Weiss Nutick. Which means my DNA matches are all closer relations or I have to go further back to prior generations.

My great-grandmother Alice Elizabeth Nutick Armstrong with all of her children. My grandfather is on the far left in the back.

References:

  1. Barbelroth in der Pfalz. 100% Pfalz • Barbelroth in der Pfalz (100prozent-pfalz.de)
  2. Kapellen-Drusweiler in der Pfalz. Kapellen-Drusweiler in der Pfalz | www.pfalz-info.com
  3. What Is White In German (questionfun.com
  4. Kayser (surname) – Wikipedia
  5. Hoffman – Wikipedia
  6. Ohl Coat of Arms / Ohl Family Crest (4crests.com)
  7. Surname Database: Weinmann Last Name Origin (surnamedb.com)
  8. Scherer Name Meaning & Scherer Family History at Ancestry.com®
  9. Grosshans Name Meaning & Grosshans Family History at Ancestry.com®
  10. Lebeau Name Meaning & Lebeau Family History at Ancestry.com®
  11. Foerster Name Meaning, Family History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms, German (houseofnames.com)
  12. Sartor surname meaning – Ancestry.com
  13. Barth surname meaning – Ancestry.com
  14. Acker surname meaning – Ancestry.com
  15. Gleich surname meaning – 4crests.com

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

About Anna Kasper, ACDP

I am an avid Genealogist. I am currently a student at Phillips Theological Seminary (one of the few Catholics!). I am an ACDP - Associate of the Congregation of Divine Providence (Sisters of Divine Providence of Texas). If you are unfamiliar with what a Religious Associate (also called an Affiliate, Consociate, Oblate, Companion) is exactly, visit my about me page for more information. In community college, I majored in American Sign Language/Deaf Studies, and Interdisciplinary Studies when at university.
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5 Responses to My Weiss, Fried, Propheter, and Related Ancestors from Klingenmünster, Germany

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