My Lozier/Losure/Loser/Looser/Loeser Ancestors from Oberriexingen, Germany (and related lines)

My maternal 3rd great-grandparents Joseph Losure and Sarah Lozier were 1st cousins.

The furthest I can take this line back is to my 8th great-grandfather Elias Looser. He was born about 1663 in Oberriexingen, Ludwigsburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. I found one researcher listing his date of death as 14 August 1741, but I have been unable, as of yet, to locate a record supporting this death date. He married Anna ____.

Elias Looser and Anna ___ had the following children based on baptism records:

  1. Margaretha Looser baptized 15 October 1682 in Oberriexingen.
  2. Hanss Jacob Looser baptized 21 March 1685 in Oberriexingen. He died 25 November 1762 in Oberriexingen. He married before 1707 to Anna Maria Knapper. She was the daughter of Hans Conrad Knapper and Barbara ____. This is my direct line.
  3. Hanss Wilhelm Looser baptized 22 April 1688 in Oberriexingen. He died in 1762 in Oberriexingen. He married first to Anna Catharina ______. They had ten children. After her death he married second on 27 January 1733 in Oberriexingen to Margaretha (Anna Margaretha) Schmid. Four children were born to the second marriage.
  4. Anna Maria Looser baptized 26 February 1692 in Oberriexingen.

Anna Maria Knapper was the daughter of Hans Conrad Knapper and Barbara ____.

Hans Conrad Knapper and Barbara ____ had the following children based on baptism records:

  1. Anna Catharina Knapper baptized on 9 September 1682 in Oberriexingen.
  2. Anna Barbara Knapper baptized on 5 March 1684 in Oberriexingen.
  3. Anna Maria Knapper baptized on 9 December 1689 in Oberriexingen. She married Hanss Jacob Looser before 1707 in Oberriexingen. This is my direct line.
  4. Johann Geoge Knapper – baptized as Johann Jerg Knapper (Jerg is a nickname for Georg) on 25 April 1691 in Oberriexingen. He married on 13 November 1714 in Enzweihingen (which is 6 miles from Oberriexingen) to Anna Barbara Gukhel.

My line continues with Hanss Jacob Looser/Loser and Anna Maria Knapper.

Children of Hanss Jacob Looser and Anna Maria Knapper based on baptism and other records:

  1. Matthäus (Matthaeus) Loser baptized 7 October 1707 in Oberriexingen, and died 1766 in Bethel Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He married first to Barbara ___, and after her death, he married second on 18 November 1738 in Oberriexingen to Catharina Barbara Schwenck. This is my direct line.
  2. Christianus Loser baptized on 23 July 1710 in Oberriexingen.
  3. Elias Loser born about 1720 in Oberriexingen. He married on 5 November 1748 in Oberriexingen to Anna Maria Stroh.
  4. Johann Jacob Looser born about 1725 in Oberriexingen. He married on 4 February 1749 in Oberriexingen to Eva Catharina Ansel.

There most likely would have been other children born to Hanss Jacob Looser and Anna Maria Knapper, born between 1711 and 1719. I will update this blog post when or if I discover additional records and children for this couple.

Matthäus (Matthaeus) Loser married first about 1730 to Barbara _____. She died before 1738, and he married second on the 18 November 1738 in Oberriexingen to Catharina Barbara Schwenck. Her family were from 12.4 miles away in Stuttgart. She was the daughter of Johan/Hans Conrad Schwenck and Albertina/Sabina Dorothea Keller. I cannot take the Schwenck line back further, but I am able to take her mother’s lines back a few more generations.

Albertina/Sabina Dorothea Keller was born in early May 1695 in Stuttgard and baptized there on 9 May 1695. She was the daughter of Leonhardt Keller and Dorothea _____.

Leonhardt Keller was the son of Leonhardt Keller (Sr.). Leonardt Keller (Sr.) was born and baptized in Stuttgard. He was the son of Sebastian Keller and Anna Harnester.

Although the baptism record for Catharina Barbara Schwenck is found in Stuttgart u Untertürkheim, the family had migrated to Enzweihingen by 1716 when the baptism record of her sister Anna Maria Schwenck is found there and in 1730 the baptism record of her sister Johanna Elisabeta Schwenck also is found in Enzweihingen. Oberriexingen is 2.4 miles from Enzweihingen.

In the baptism record of Catharina Barbara Schwenck found in Stuttgart u Untertürkheim on 30 May 1714 her parents are listed as Johan/Hans Conrad Schwenck and Albertina/Sabina Dorothea Keller. In the baptism records of Anna Maria Schwenck and Johanna Elisabeta Schwenck the parents are listed as Johann Conrad Schwenck and Regina Schwenck. Some list Regina with a maiden name of Brucks. I have not seen documentation supporting the Brucks surname. Albertina / Sabina / Regina could all be the same name being mistranscribed. Or maybe Albertina/Sabina Dorothea Keller Schwenck died in 1714 possibly in childbirth or of complications, and Johan/Hans Conrad Schwenck married a woman named Regina (Brucks). Either way, the family migrated to Enzweihingen, which is close by to Oberriexingen where Catharina Barbara Schwenck marries Matthäus (Matthaeus) Loser on 18 November 1738.

Mattäus (Matthaeus) Loeser/Loser/Looser and first wife Barbara ____ had at least two known children based on baptism records:

  1. Hanss Jerg Loser baptized on 25 October 1731 in Oberriexingen.
  2. Hanss Jacob Loser/Loeser baptized 26 September 1736 in Oberriexingen. He married on 22 November 1762 in Bethel, Berks County, Pennsylvania to Margaretha Schmidt.

Mattäus (Matthaeus) Loeser/Loser/Looser and second wife Catherina Barbara Schwenck had 7 known children based on baptism records:

  1. Elias Loser baptized 7 March 1740 in Oberriexingen. He died 3 August 1745 in Oberriexingen.
  2. George Loeser born about 1741 in Oberriexingen. He died 1773 in Mount Zion, Bethel Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. He married 6 February 1751 in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania to Barbara Schuckin.
  3. Christof “Stofel” Loser (Lozier/Losure) baptized Hanss Christoph Loser on 23 January 1742 in Oberriexingen. He died 30 September 1822 in Plain Township, Wayne County, Ohio. He married about 1768 in Pennsylvania to Eva Elisabetha _____. (My 5th great-grandparents).
  4. Friderica Dorothea Looser baptized 11 May 1744 in Oberriexingen.
  5. Matthaeus Loeser/Loser baptized 28 July 1748 in Oberriexingen.
  6. Maria Agness Looser baptized 30 January 1750 in Oberriexingen.
  7. Anna Maria Loser baptized 12 September 1751 in Oberriexingen.
The main street through Oberriexingen in Baden-Württemberg (Germany) with the Church of St. George in background. Photo from File:Hauptstraße Oberriexingen.jpg – Wikimedia Commons.

A bit of information about Oberriexingen, Germany:

Oberriexingen is a town in the district of Ludwigsburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is situated on the river Enz. It is 12.4 miles northwest of Stuttgart, and 10.6 miles west of Ludwigsburg. The current population of Oberriexingen is a little over 3,000 people.

Loeser is a German “habitational name from any of several places called Lösau, Losa, or Losau. [It is a] Status name for a tenant farmer who had bought off the feudal obligations on his land, from Middle High German losen, lösen ‘to redeem’. variant of Lazar.” (3) Loser is a variant of the name Loeser.

Schwenk name meaning: North German: variant of Schwanke. South German (mainly Württemberg, Silesia, and Bavaria): from Middle High German swenken ‘to swing or sling’, apparently a nickname, of which the original application cannot now be established.” (8) Since my Schwenk family were from Stuttgart which is in Baden-Württemberg in south Germany the name would mean “from Middle High German swenken ‘to swing or sling’.”

Keller surname meaning: “German: from Middle High German kellaere ‘cellarman’, ‘cellar master’ (Latin cellarius, denoting the keeper of the cella ‘store chamber’, ‘pantry’). Hence an occupational name for the overseer of the stores, accounts, or household in general in, for example, a monastery or castle. Kellers were important as trusted stewards in a great household, and in some cases were promoted to ministerial rank.” (9)

Knapper (Knäpper) is a German surname and is an “unflattering nickname from an agent derivative of knappen ‘to be stingy’ or, in some places, ‘to grab or snatch’.” (22)

According to the Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne and Holmes County Ohio, published in 1889 it is said that Christoph . . . “Stofel” Lozier, came to America from Germany with his parents, when seven years of age. He was a weaver by trade, an occupation he followed in Virginia, and at an early date he [re]located [to] Westmoreland County, moving thence in 1814 to Wayne County, Ohio. Stofel Lozier had a family of twelve sons and one daughter, and four of the sons and the daughter came with him to Ohio; three of the sons were married and had families.” (1)

It appears the family came to the U.S. at least a few years later, since Stofel‘s two youngest siblings were born in Oberriexingen in 1750 and 1751. His brother marries in 1758 in Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. So we know the family came after 1751 and was here at least a few years before 1758.

I have not found the family in any records in Virginia but they are found in records in Pennsylvania and Ohio.

ChristophStofel” Lozier/Losure and Eva Elisabeth _____ had 13 children:

  1. Matthias Lozier born about 1769 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 1825 in Perry County, Ohio. He married first to Maria Magdalena _____ and married second to Rosina Dumbauld. (My 4th great-grandparents).
  2. Henry Lozier born about 1770 in Pennsylvania and died after 1850 in Noble County, Indiana. He married 27 August 1805 in Columbiana County, Ohio to Elizabeth Snook.
  3. Elizabeth Lozier born about 1772 in Pennsylvania and died in Wayne County, Ohio, she married Jacob Hines.
  4. John Lozier born 3 January 1772 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 31 March 1855 in Petersburg, Mahoning, Ohio. He married 25 April 1802 in Columbiana County, Ohio to Anna Marie Musser.
  5. Nicholas Lozier born 10 January 1774 in Pennsylvania and died 24 October 1813 in West Township, Columbiana County, Ohio. He married Elizabeth _____.
  6. Peter Losure/Lozier born about 1774 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 17 March 1829 in Wayne County, Ohio. He married Elizabeth Barbara Womelsdorf. (My 4th great-grandparents).
  7. Jacob Lozier born about 1780 in Pennsylvania and died 14 February 1845 in Fulton, Fulton County, Ohio. He married to unknown named wife and they had issue.
  8. Sebastian Lozier born about 1782 in Pennsylvania and died 16 October 1855 in Columbiana, Columbiana County, Ohio. He married Margaret Hines.
  9. John Jacob (Johann Jacob) Losure/Lozier born 17 August 1783 in Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 1875 in Dawson, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. He married to Mary A. Washabaugh.
  10. Christopher Losure born about 1784 in Pennsylvania and died 16 June 1841 in Saltlick, Fayette County, Pennsylvania.
  11. Isaac Lozier born about 1785 in Pennsylvania and died 1881 in Greenup, Greenup County, Kentucky. He married Mary Gordon. (Some give his birthplace as Virginia).
  12. George Lozier born 14 October 1788 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 1 November 1848 in Lakeville, Holmes County, Ohio. He married Elizabeth Manger.
  13. David Christopher Losure born about 1790 in Donegal, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 1839 in Wayne, Wayne County, Ohio. He married Hannah Burgan.

I descend from two sons of ChristophStofel” Lozier/Losure and Eva Elisabeth _____.

My first line is through their son Matthias Lozier.

Matthias Lozier was born about 1769 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 1825 in Perry County, Ohio. He is buried in the Old Baptist Cemetery in Pike Township (now part of the city of New Lexington), Perry County, Ohio.

He married about 1790 in Pennsylvania to Maria Magdalena ____. They had the known following children:

  1. Anna Elizabeth Lozier born 11 March 1791 in Donegal Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.
  2. Rosina Lozier born 24 July 1794 in Donegal Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.
German: Border triangle Germany-France-Switzerland. Photo from File:Grossraum Loerrach Basel.png – Wikimedia Commons.

Matthias Lozier married second about 1801 in Pennsylvania to Rosina Dumbauld (widow of Joseph Nathanial Slaughter). Rosina Dumbauld was the daughter of Ernest Frederick Dumbauld and Elizabeth Hager. The granddaughter of Abraham Dumbauld and Salome Lang and great granddaughter of Johann Martin Dumbald and Anna Maria Tschudi. The Dumbauld family were originally from Basel, Basel-City, Switzerland, and they go back some generations in Switzerland. Eventually they migrated 6.5 miles to Lörrach, Baden-Württemberg, Germany.

Sitting on the Rhine river in northern Switzerland, Basel balances old-school and contemporary culture. Photo from City Guide: Basel, Switzerland – what to see and do | Escapism (escapismmagazine.com).

Basel, Switzerland is a city in northwestern Switzerland on the river Rhine. Basel is Switzerland’s third-most-populous city (after Zürich and Geneva) with about 200,000 inhabitants. Lörrach is a town in southwest Germany, in the valley of the Wiese, close to the French and the Swiss borders. It is the capital of the district of Lörrach in Baden-Württemberg. The city population has grown over the last century, with only 10,794 in 1905 it has now increased its population to 49,382.” (2)

Lörrach “was founded sometime before 1102, when it was first mentioned in history as a market-town. Today, Lorrach is known for its luxurious and non-traditional villas, earthquakes, Rotteln Castle, for being the capitol of Germany for one day during the Revolutions of 1849, and as the location of the largest Milka chocolate factory.

The Lörrach market. Lörrach sits In the “three-countries corner” of Switzerland, France, and Germany. Photo from Three countries, markets galore: Lörrach, Baden (DE) | Anita’s Feast (anitasfeast.com).

Dumbauld name meaning: “Origin unidentified. Possibly a Frenchified spelling of German Dambold(t), from an old personal name composed of an earlier form of Old High German tac ‘day’ + bald ‘bold’.” (9)

Hager name meaning: “Dutch and North German: from a Germanic personal name composed of hag ‘hedge’, ‘enclosure’ + hari, heri ‘army’. from a Germanic personal name, Hadugar, composed of the elements hadu- ‘combat’, ‘strife’ + gari, from garwa ‘ready’, ‘eager’. German (also Häger): topographic name for someone who lived by a hedged or fenced enclosure, Middle High German hac. German and Jewish (Ashkenazic): nickname for a thin man, from Middle High German, German hager ‘thin’, ‘gaunt’.” (10) 

“Lang is a surname of Germanic origin, closely related to Lange, Laing and Long, all of which mean “tall.”” (11)

“Tschudi (variants: Schudy, Shoudy, Shudi, Schudi, Tschudy) is a surname common in the Canton of Glarus, Switzerland. The surname Tschudy is a patronymic surname formed from a pre-existing personal name. Tschudy is the Silesian equivalent to the English name Stephan.” (12, 13)

Matthias Lozier and Rosina Dumbauld had the following children:

  1. Simon Lozier born 20 September 1807 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 9 October 1890 in Liberty, Clarke County, Iowa. He married Susana “Susan” Sarah Berge Neel.
  2. Sarah Lozier born 1810 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 1876 in Newville, DeKalb County, Indiana. She married in 1829 in Wayne County, Ohio to her first cousin Joseph Losure.

Mattias Lozier and Rosina Dumbauld along with their children Simon Lozier and Sarah Lozier and Rosina’s son from her first marriage John (John Joseph) Slaughter all came to Perry County, Ohio in 1818. Perry County was founded 1 March 1818 from parts of Fairfield, Washington and Muskingum counties. Mattias Lozier, Rosina Dumbauld, and John (John Joseph) Slaughter are all buried in the Old Baptist Cemetery in Pike Township (now part of New Lexington), Perry County, Ohio.

It is interesting to me that they ended up in Perry County. They are my ancestors on my maternal grandfather’s side. My maternal grandmother’s family were all from Perry County and were some of the first settlers there. My Kennedy and Palmer ancestors and my Lozier/Dumbauld ancestors most likely knew each other in Perry County. Purely by happenstance — for the families would not have a genealogical connection for a few generations, and my grandparents did not meet in Perry County, they met in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio.

The second son of ChristophStofel” Lozier/Losure and Eva Elisabeth_____ that I descend from is Peter Losure/Lozier.

Peter Losure/Lozier was born about 1774 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania and died 17 March 1829 in Wayne County, Ohio. He married Elizabeth Barbara Womelsdorf. She was the daughter of Jacob Womelsdorf and Catherine Kasebier. The Womelsdorf family lived in Amity, Berks County, Pennsylvania. Jacob Womelsdorf‘s brother John Womelsdorf founded Womelsdorf, Berks County, Pennsylvania.

Jacob Womelsdorf was the son of Daniel (Johann Daniel) Womelsdorf and Elisabeth Michaelis. Daniel (Johann Daniel) Womelsdorf was born 11 November 1703 in Diedenshausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany and died 6 November 1759 in Amity, Berks County, Pennsylvania. Elisabeth Michaelis was born 1703 in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany and died 1 August 1772 in Amity, Berks County, Pennsylvania.

Michaelis is a German surname that means descendant of Michael (who is like God). Some give her maiden name incorrectly as McMichael which is a Scottish surname with the same meaning. The name Michaelis is found in Mettingen, Germany.

Daniel (Johann Daniel) Daniel Womelsdorf was the son of Johannes Womelsdorf and Anna Elisabeth Kemper. Johannes Womelsdorf was born 1660 in Girkhausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany and died 1730 in Diedenshausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Anna Elisabeth Kemper was born 1665 in Girkhausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany and died 1740 in Diedenshausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

Diedenshausen Church – Photo from Diedenshausen – Wikipedia.

Diedenshausen is a small village, since 1975 a constituent community of Bad Berleburg in Siegen-Wittgenstein district and Arnsberg region in North Rhine-Westphalia in the Federal Republic of Germany. It is located on the east side of the heavily forested Rothaargebirge (Red-haired Mountains), immediately on the border with Hesse. A few houses lie to the east of the Elsoff creek which forms the state border, and they are technically in Hesse.

The small farming village of Diedenshausen was first mentioned in documents in 1194. The political philosopher Johannes Althusius was born and raised there. The accepted faith of the people was the Reformed doctrine of Calvinism. Native son Daniel Womelsdorf was the first from the village known to emigrate to America in 1724. Native son Jacob Weller von Molsdorf die Schwanfelder and his family were some of the earliest recorded members of this family to emigrate to America, landing in Philadelphia in 1710.

Today, the village has a large number of restored half-timbered houses for which reason it was designated by the German government, in 1998, as one of the “Federal Golden Villages”. In 2008 Diedenshausen celebrated its millennium (1000th anniversary) as a dedicated village/area which drew many American descendants to celebrate as well.” (14)

Half-timbered village Diedenshausen. Photo from Fachwerkdorf Diedenshausen | Objektansicht (kuladig.de).

Johannes Womelsdorf was the son of Georg Womelsdorf and Anna Else Lueckel. Both were born and died in Diedenshausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Georg Womelsdorf was the son of Johannes Womelsdorf and Margaretha Bickelbach. Johannes Womelsdorf was born and died in Diedenshausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany and Margaretha Bickelbach was born in Alertshausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

Anna Else Lueckel was the daughter of Zacharias Lueckel and granddaughter of Johann Lueckel and Elisabetha “Anna” Rausch. All of Diedenshausen, Siegen-Wittgenstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

Anna Elisabeth Kemper was the daughter of Johannes Kemper and Anna Loew. And granddaughter of Johannes Loew and Christine Scheffhen. They all were born and lived in Diedenshausen, Seigen-Wittgensteine, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

Girkhausen is 7 miles away from Diedenshausen and Alertshausen is 2.3 miles from Diedenshausen.

Womelsdorf is a “German habitational name from a place so named near Erndtebrück.” (4) Erndtebrück is 15.4 miles from Diedenshausen and 14.7 miles from Girkhausen.

Meaning of the surname Kemper: “The German form of Kemper designated a peasant farmer, while the Dutch referenced someone who worked with hemp. Kemper may have also been used as a surname for people from one of the German-Dutch towns called Kempen.” (5)

The surname Scheffhen was most likely Scheff or Schaff since the letters “en” were added to the the female’s maiden name in church records. The German word Schaffen originally meant “create”. The word schaffen as it is used today “is a translation for — to succeed, to pull off and to manage.” One source states that the surnames Scheff and Schaff are derived from the Middle High German term “schaffaere,” which referred to the manager or steward of a household.” Another source states that Schaff is a “metonymic occupational name for a tubmaker, from Middle High German schaff(e) ‘wooden vessel’, ‘scoop’.” And another source states that both the surnames are a variant of the German surname Schaaf which is a “German: metonymic occupational name for a shepherd, from Middle High German schaf ‘sheep’. In some cases it may have been a nickname for someone thought to resemble a sheep, or a habitational name for someone living at a house distinguished by the sign of a sheep.” (17, 18, 19, & 20)

I was unable to find any information about the surname Bickelbach. The German word bach means a stream, creek, or brook. I did find the meaning for the surname Bickel by itself without being attached to bach. The surname Bickel is “Dutch and German: from bickel ‘pickaxe’ or ‘chisel’, hence a metonymic occupational name for someone who made pickaxes or worked with a pickaxe or for a stonemason. Compare Bick. German: nickname for a dice player, from the same word in the sense ‘die’. South German: from a pet form of Burkhart.” (21) Since my Bickelbach ancestors were not from Southern Germany, it would not be a pet form of surname Burkhart. It may or not be related to Bick being a nickname for a dice player. My best guess would be that the surname in the case of my family originated with an ancestor that lived near a stream, brook, or creek, and they were someone that worked making pickaxes or used one and/or worked as a stonemason.

Lueckel is a German surname that means “Descendant of Liudiko (little people), a pet form of names beginning with Leute (people), as Liudman, Liuderich and Liutwin.” (6)

Rausch name meaning: nickname for a noisy person, from a noun derivative of Middle High German ruschen ‘to make a noise’. topographic name for someone who lived by a swamp, from Middle High German rusch(e) ‘reed’.” (7)

Meaning of Loew surname: “German (Löw): variant of Loewe.” (15) “Loewe is derived from the Middle High German “lewe,” meaning “lion.”” (16)

Peter Losure/Lozier and Elizabeth Barbara Womelsdorf had the following children:

  1. David Losure/Lozier born about 1793 in Pennsylvania and died 6 November 1826 in Plain Township, Wayne County, Ohio. He married Mary _____.
  2. Mary A. (Anna Maria) Losure/Lozier born 1 May 1795 in Beaver County, Pennsylvania and died before August 1837 in Wayne County, Ohio. She married 10 February 1820 in Wayne County, Ohio to Levi Baton/Eaton Smith.
  3. Barbara Losure born about 1796 in Beaver County, Pennsylvania and died 14 April 1871 in Riceland, Wayne County, Ohio. She married Peter Troxel.
  4. Jacob Losure born 3 July 1800 Berks County, Pennsylvania and died 1 February 1881 in Clay Township, Kosciusko County, Indiana. He married Rheumay Wilson and Dorcas Smith.
  5. Joseph Losure born 18 September 1801 in Berks County, Pennsylvania and died before 1880 in Newville, DeKalb County, Indiana. He married his first cousin Sarah Lozier. (My 3rd great-grandparents).

At this point in my family history story it becomes rather sad. My 3rd great-grandparents, as I noted prior, were 1st cousins. I have several 1st cousin intermarriages in my tree, although most are during the early Colonial America time period. In the case of my 3rd great-grandparents, their close kinship caused issues with almost all of their children. My 2nd great-grandmother was the only one of their children who married and has descendants today.

Joseph Losure and Sarah Lozier had the following children:

  1. William Samuel Losure born December 1830 in Wayne County, Ohio. He never married. After the death of his parents, beginning with the 1880 Census, he is described as “idiotic”. He worked as a farm hand. He is last found aged 70 years old in the 1900 Census living in Keyser, in the DeKalb County Asylum (Poor House).
  2. Simon Losure born about 1833 in Wayne County, Ohio. He never married. He is described in the censuses as having a physical disability. He worked as a farm hand. He died on 16 December 1903 in Keyser, De Kalb, Indiana and is listed as pauper on his death certificate.
  3. Lisa Jane Losure born about 1835 in Wayne County, Ohio. She never married. After the death of her parents, beginning with the 1880 Census, she is described as “idiotic”. She worked as a house-maid. She is last found aged 65 years old in the 1900 Census living in Keyser, in the DeKalb County Asylum (Poor House).
  4. Nancy M. Losure born 1838 in Plain Township, Wayne County, Ohio and died 1890 in Newville, DeKalb County, Indiana. She married 9 September 1858 in DeKalb County, Indiana to Lorin Richard Cole (son of Lewis Cole and Cordelia Merchant). (My great-great grandparents).
  5. Mary Ann Losure born 1841 in Wayne County, Ohio. She never married. She died about 1862 in Newville, DeKalb County, Indiana and was buried on the family farm. She had a child out-of-wedlock in 1862, the identity of the father of this child is unknown. She may of died in childbirth or of complications. Her son Preble Losure is found living with his grandparents in the 1870 Census, aged 8 years old. He disappears from all records after this census.
  6. Rebecca Ann Losure born September 1843 in Wayne County, Ohio. She never married. After the death of her parents, beginning with the 1880 Census, she is described as “idiotic”. She worked as a house-maid. She is found in the 1900 Census living in Keyser, in the DeKalb County Asylum (Poor House) – along with 2 of her siblings. She died 10 February 1907 in DeKalb County, Indiana and is listed as pauper on her death certificate.

References:

1. Commemorative Biographical Record of Wayne & Holmes Co. Publ. Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co., page 810, 1889.

2. Basel – Wikipedia; Lörrach – Wikipedia.

3. Loeser Name Meaning & Loeser Family History at Ancestry.com®

4. Womelsdorf Name Meaning & Womelsdorf Family History at Ancestry.com®

5. Kemper: Name Meaning, Popularity, and Similar Names | Nameberry

6. Luecke Surname Origin, Meaning & Last Name History (forebears.io)

7. Rausch Name Meaning & Rausch Family History at Ancestry.com®

8. Schwenk Name Meaning & Schwenk Family History at Ancestry.com®

9. Dumbauld Name Meaning & Dumbauld Family History at Ancestry.com®

10. Hager Name Meaning & Hager Family History at Ancestry.com®

11. Lang (surname) – Wikipedia

12. Tschudi – Wikipedia

13. Tschudy Name Meaning, Family History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms (houseofnames.com)

14. Diedenshausen – Wikipedia

15. Loew Name Meaning & Loew Family History at Ancestry.com®

16. Loewe Name Meaning, Family History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms (houseofnames.com)

17. Schaff Surname Meaning – Ancestry

18. Scheff Surname Meaning – House of Names

19. The meaning and use of “schaffen” | German is easy!

20. Schaaf Surname Meaning – Ancestry

21. Bickel Surname Meaning – Ancestry

22. Knapper Name Meaning – Ancestry

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

About Anna Kasper, ACDP

I am an avid Genealogist. I am currently a student at Phillips Theological Seminary (one of the few Catholics!). I am an ACDP - Associate of the Congregation of Divine Providence (Sisters of Divine Providence of Texas). If you are unfamiliar with what a Religious Associate (also called an Affiliate, Consociate, Oblate, Companion) is exactly, visit my about me page for more information. In community college, I majored in American Sign Language/Deaf Studies, and Interdisciplinary Studies when at university.
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1 Response to My Lozier/Losure/Loser/Looser/Loeser Ancestors from Oberriexingen, Germany (and related lines)

  1. Pingback: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. Theme for March: Females. The story of the life of my 3rd great-grandmother Cordelia Merchant Cole. | Anna's Musings & Writings

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