Famous Fahey Kin. Actress Myrna Fahey. 52 Ancestors, Week 28 – Characters.

The beautiful and talented Myrna Fahey.

This week’s writing prompt is Characters. Although we are always free to be creative and interpret the prompt however we wish, some suggestions were: every family has a person who might be described as a “character,” or someone named for a famous character, or working through a language that uses characters other than what you’re used to, or deciphering a character on a tombstone? But as always, we can be creative and have fun with the writing prompt. I did notice another participant took it to be someone who played a character and wrote about her 3rd cousin actress Donna Reed. This got me thinking that maybe I should write about my 3rd cousin (1x removed) actress Myrna Fahey. I should note here that Myrna Fahey is also my 11th cousin! But more about that later.

She is not as well-known or remembered as more recent actors with Fahey/Fahy roots in Galway. Jeff Fahey’s great-grandfather was Thomas Fahey who was born in and married, Ellen M. Carney/Kearney, in Glenamaddy, Galway, Ireland. Glenamaddy is near the village of Boyounagh.

Actress Jennifer Lawrence also has Fahey ancestors from Galway. Her 3rd great grandmother was Ellen Hobbens Broderick who was born in Gurtymadden, Galway, Ireland and immigrated to Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky. She was the daughter of Michael Hobbens and Catherine Fahey.

I have Fahey connections to both Mountbellew and the Peterswell/Gort areas further south. Gurtymadden is 18 miles from Peterswell, while Glenamaddy is 12 miles from and closer to Mountbellew. I have not found a DNA or records connection between Jeff Fahey’s ancestors and mine, as of yet. But I have found a DNA connection to Jennifer Lawrence via her Fahey kin. I am still working out the connection between her Fahey ancestors and mine.

Myrna Fahey with Vincent Price and Mark Damon in the 1960 film House of Usher.

Back to Myrna Fahey. I love, love, love, Vincent Price, so I knew who Myrna Fahey was right away, from seeing her in the 1960 film House of Usher in which she co-stared with Vincent Price and Mark Damon. And yes, I do have a more distant family connection to Vincent Price, which thrills me to pieces! We share Spencer ancestors in Colonial America. This connection to him is on my maternal side.

I knew that my paternal great-great grandfather Daniel Wolfetone “Dan” Fahey (Fay) had a brother, Patrick Fahey, that came to the USA a few years prior to the family and settled in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine before 1848. By 1855 Patrick had migrated to Vermillion, Dakota County, Minnesota. I also knew he had a brother named Edward, and I discovered that Edward Fahey, who was one of the siblings that originally stayed in Ireland, did come to the USA in 1860 and, as his older brother Patrick had done earlier, he settled in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine. Edward did not migrate elsewhere, he stayed in Maine.

Myrna Fahey with Mark Damon in the 1960 film House of Usher.

Edward Fahey’s occupation as listed in the Bangor city directories was a stonecutter. He married Mary Burke in 1864. Her parentage is unknown, but she was born in Ireland and immigrated to the USA in 1861. They had the following children:

  1. John F. Fahey born February 1866 in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, and died 1944 in Penobscot County, Maine. He married Nellie I. Murphy. They had only one child Francis Edward “Mickey” Fahey, who was the father of Myrna Fahey.
  2. Edward P. Fahey born February 1868 in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, and died before the 1950 census in Maine. He never married. He is listed as a Riverman in Bangor city directories and as a laborer. As an older man, I find him living in The Salvation Army House/Hotel in Bangor in the 1930 and 1940 Censuses.
  3. Mary Ellen Fahey born April 1870 in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, and died 27 June 1900 in Bangor. She never married.
  4. Anna “Annie” Fahey born 26 August 1872 in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine, and died 6 August 1976. She never married. She began working before she was aged 19 years old as a Compositor and continued this trade for several decades until she made a claim for Social Security on 11 March 1944 at the age of 74. A compositor was a typesetter, the person who inserted each letter of a word into the frames for printing. They had to be able to think back-to-front to put all the letters and punctuation in the right place – and they had to do it at some speed!  It was very much a skilled job. Interestingly, women were often employed in this occupation, it was said due to their deftness of touch and quickness of motion, making them particularly skilled at this job. She lived to the ripe old age of 103!

As noted above, only one of the children, John F. Fahey has descendants today. He was the only one to marry of his siblings. He married Nellie I. Murphy on 27 August 1904 in Bangor, Maine. Nellie was born in Rhode Island to Lawrence Murphy (born in Ireland) and Martha Slavin (born in Canada).

John F. Fahey and Nellie I. Murphy had one child, a son:

  1. Francis Edward “Mickey” Fahey born 11 April 1906 in Carmel, Penobscot County, Maine, and died 23 January 1985 in Columbia Falls, Washington County, Maine. He was the father of Myrna Fahey.
Myrna Fahey appearing on an episode of Batman with Burt Ward.

Francis Edward “Mickey” Fahey married Olevia Newcomb on 1 January 1927 in Bangor, Penobscot County, Maine. She was the daughter of Clyde Allen Newcomb and Laura J. Ingraham. Her Newcomb ancestors were in Maine for some generations, then her ancestors go back to Colonial Massachusetts. Although I do not share Newcomb ancestors with her mother, my ancestors did live in the same places in Colonial Massachusetts , and I am related via marriage to her Newcomb ancestors.

But I do share Hopkins ancestors with Olevia Newcomb! We are both descended from Mayflower Pilgrim Stephen Hopkins and his first wife Mary. Making me a 10th cousin 1x removed to Myrna Fahey’s mother Olevia Newcomb. Which is how I am both Myrna Fahey’s 3rd cousin 1x removed and also her 11th cousin!

Francis Edward “Mickey” Fahey married Olevia Newcomb had three children:

  1. Michael Newcomb Fahey born 30 May 1927 in Carmel, Penobscot County, Maine, and died 29 October 2001 in Fort Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida. He served in the US Navy during WWII.
  2. Charles Francis Fahey born 8 June 1930 in Carmel, Penobscot County, Maine, and died 29 June 2010 in Bar Harbor, Hancock County, Maine. He married/1 to (Living) Usiak and m/2 to (Living) Trask Davisson.
  3. Myrna Elizabeth Fahey born 12 March 1933 in Carmel, Penobscot County, Maine, and died 6 MAY 1973 in Santa Monica, Los Angeles County, California. She never married.
Myrna Fahey (1959) from a guest appearance on the Western anthology series Death Valley Days.

Myrna Fahey is probably known best for her role as Maria Crespo in Walt Disney’s Zorro and as Madeline Usher in The Fall of the House of Usher.

She was a former cheerleader and beauty pageant queen. She was an avid skier and stock investor and was known for insisting that her dressing rooms be equipped with a stock ticker.

She appeared in episodes of 37 television series from the 1950s into the early 1970s, including Bonanza, Wagon TrainThe Time Tunnel with Robert Colbert, Maverick with James Garner, 77 Sunset Strip with Efrem Zimbalist Jr., LaramieGunsmoke with James Arness, The Adventures of Superman with George Reeves, Kraft Suspense TheatreDaniel Boone with Fess Parker, Perry Mason with Raymond Burr, and Batman with Adam West and Burt Ward. (1)

Myrna Fahey (1958) with Guy Williams in an episode of Zorro.

In 1961, Myrna took a starring role in the TV series Father of the Bride, based on the acclaimed film of the same name. She was cast based solely on her striking resemblance to Elizabeth Taylor, a comparison that Myrna did not appreciate, revealing to one interviewer “the fact that I’m supposed to look like Elizabeth What’s-Her-Name had nothing to do with my getting [the part], because we don’t really look alike, I don’t think.” Myrna fought to be released from her contract with the show, citing that too much emphasis was put on the “father” character and not enough on her “bride” character. the series lasted one season.

FBI report and investigation

It was reported in December 1955 that she was at the Coconut Grove night club with Frank Sinatra associate Nick Sevano. (3) Myrna briefly dated Yankees baseball star Joe DiMaggio. In 1963, both Joe and Myrna received a series of anonymous death threats. Several messages threatened her with facial disfigurement with acid and Joe with the killing of his son, Joe Jr. As per the FBI interviews, the two only dined together once during a work visit to Rome in June 1962 – but columnists had recycled this alleged romance throughout the end of 1962 and 1963, to dramatic results. The FBI eventually traced those letters to an obsessive Marilyn Monroe fan and patient in a psychiatric institution in San Jose, California. In addition to briefly dating baseball player Joe DiMaggio, she also dated actor George Hamilton. (1 & 2)

In the early 1970’s, Myrna’s workload slowed, as she was diagnosed with cancer. She appeared in one episode of the medical drama Marcus Welby, MD and played a beauty pageant chaperone in the TV movie The Great American Beauty Contest. The producers devised her bit part solely to help her maintain her industry health benefits during her final illness. It would prove to be her final role. Myrna lost her long battle with cancer, at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, on 6 May 1973 at the age of 40. She was buried at Mount Pleasant Catholic Cemetery in Bangor, Maine. (1)

Her final resting place.

References:

  1. Myrna Fahey. wikipedia.org.
  2. Marilyn Monroe & Joe DiMaggio: A Retrospective – Part I. Blog on tumblr.com.
  3. Carroll, Harrison, syndicated columnist (December 21, 1955). “Behind the Scenes in Hollwood”. Greenburg Daily News. Greenburg, Indiana. p. 4 – via Newspapers.com.

If you’d like to learn more about the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks project, please visit here:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

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If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

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William G. Lyons, My 2nd Great Granduncle. 52 Ancestors, Week 27: Extended Family.

This week’s writing prompt for 52 Ancestors is Extended Family. We often focus on those people from whom we descend. But what about their siblings, aunts, uncles, and cousins? They played a role in our ancestors’ lives, just like those people play a role in our own lives. This is a good week to explore the lives of these other people in the family tree. I chose to write about my 2nd great granduncle William G. Lyons. The mining industry in Northern California and especially in Nevada played a big part in his life.

Photo: Miners at a mine in Nevada in the late 1800’s

He was the son of James W. Lyons and Catherine Ann Barton. His father was born in New Jersey and was of a New Jersey Lyons family, but his line remains a brick wall. His mother was the daughter of Thomas Barton, and the family was of Bristol and New Britain in Bucks County Pennsylvania. DNA has given some clues to the Barton family origins, but it mostly remains a brick wall. But Catherine Barton’s mother was Rebecca Cooper who was descended on her paternal side from Pennsylvania Quakers. On Rebecca Cooper’s maternal side, she was descended from early German and Dutch settlers in New York.

James W. Lyons and Catherine Barton had several children including:

  1. Elizabeth “Betsy” Lyons born about November 1817 in Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She is listed as a female aged under 10 years old in the 1820 Census and as a female aged 20 to 29 in the household of her father in the 1840 Census. She’s not living with her parents in the 1850 Census. She may have married, but I haven’t found a marriage record for her. Or she died prior to 1850. Little is known about her.
  2. Daughter (Possibly Sarah) Lyons born about 1818/1819 in Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She is one of two females under the age of 10 listed in the 1820 Census and is most likely the female listed as aged 15 to 19 in the household of her father in the 1840 Census. She is not living with her parents in the 1850 Census. She may have died prior to 1850.
  3. Catherine Ann Lyons born 26 December 1825 in Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died 1903 in Fletcher, Miami County, Ohio. She married/1 on 28 March 1847 in Hamilton County, Ohio to Albert Addis. After his death she married/2 on 25 October 1850 in Lost Creek, Miami County, Ohio to Isaac H. Stinsman.
  4. Henrietta Frances “Nettie” Lyons born 24 April 1828 in Bristol, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died 7 December 1910 in Milford, Clermont County, Ohio. She married on 25 February 1847 in Hamilton County, Ohio to Marshall Davis Armstrong.
  5. William G. Lyons born 4 September 1830 in Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died 10 June 1904 in Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona. He never married.
  6. Daughter (Mary M.) Lyons born about 1831 in Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She is listed as a female aged 5 to 9 years old in the 1840 Census. I believe she is the Mary M. Lyons who marries Dimick/Derick B. Ten Eick on 17 December 1848 in Miami County, Ohio. He dies 3 months later. I do not know what happened to her.
  7. James W. Lyons, Jr. born about 1833 in Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died after 1880 and before the 1900 census. He married on 20 February 1864 in Butler County, Ohio to Anna M. Fisher.
  8. Daughter Lyons born about 1836 in Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She is listed as one of two females aged under 5 years old in the 1840 Census. She is not found in the 1850 Census with her parents and siblings. She may have died prior to 1850. The other female under 5 years old is Martha.
  9. Martha A. Knight Lyons born 3 October 1838 in Falls, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died 15 August 1928 in Benton, Butler County, Kansas. She married on 15 October 1856 in Miami County, Ohio to Bradford Carroll Armstrong, as his third wife. (They are my direct ancestors). Marshall Davis Armstrong and Bradford Carroll Armstrong were brothers, so two Lyons sisters married two Armstrong brothers.

There are a few Lyons brides found in the Miami County, Ohio marriage records that do not belong to the other Lyons families known to be in Miami County at the same times as my Lyons ancestors. Here are the marriage records that may include the unknown named Lyons daughters above:

Sarah Lyons who marries Jeremiah Terry on 9 July 1847 in Miami County, Ohio. I have been unable to locate either of them in additional records, nor have I been able to find anyone researching this couple. This couple may have been part of the group of settlers that were Randolph Slaves that settled in Miami County during the summer of 1846. And as such would not be connected to my Lyons ancestors. It appears that the word colored was written in the marriage record, although I do not find a record listing them among the names of the settlers.

Mary M. Lyons who marries Dimick/Derick B. Ten Eick on 17 December 1848 in Miami County, Ohio. There is a Derick Teneick that died on 19 Mar 1849 in Miami County, Ohio. He was 3 months shy of his 22nd birthday. He is buried in Kepper Cemetery in Tipp City, Miami County, Ohio. If this is the same man in the marriage record, then he died 3 months after his marriage. I have not found anyone listing that he was married in their family trees. His name is listed as Derick Teneick on his headstone, but his name is also found in records as Derick TenEyck/Ten Eick. He was the son of Henry P TenEyck (Teneick) and Eleanor Baracalow.

Most of the siblings stayed in Ohio for some decades with a few later venturing to Kansas. Only William G. Lyons decided to venture further west.

There are no known photos of William G. Lyons. In the 1850 census he is found living near, but not with, his family in Lost Creek, Miami County, Ohio. He is aged 20 years old and is working as a laborer.

One of the many mines in Placer County, California.

But by 1855 he had ventured to Placer County, California. According to his obituary he came to California from his eastern home during the ’49 excitement and followed placer mining there for a number of years. Placer County, California was at the heart of the 1848 California Gold Rush.

The same obituary states he didn’t come to Nevada until 1869, but I find him in directories in Virginia City, Storey County, Nevada in 1861 and in Dayton, Lyons County, Nevada in 1868-1869. Also included in his obituary is the following: The deceased was one of the pioneers of Nevada and especially of White Pine County, having been prominently identified with the mining industry in this section since the early days of Mineral City in the 70’s. [He] Was one of the original locators of the Monitor mine at Taylor, which was sold to the New Eberhardt Co. of London, England. He was also one of the locators of the Chainman mine here [White Pine County]. The Chainman mine was primarily a gold mine but was secondarily a silver mine. Moving to Virginia City during the palmy Comstock days, from which place he came to White Pines in ’69.

I was unable to locate him in any records for the time period he was in Placer County, California, when he was engaged in the mining industry there.

For great content and more photos, please visit the Nevada Expeditions website. A photo of the Taylor [White Pine County, Nevada] Mine shaft taken in 2020. The Monitor Mine was mostly a silver mine.

I was able to locate him in the 1870 Nevada territorial Census index for Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada, but the image of the census was unavailable. Census records for Nevada, prior to the 1875 Nevada state census and the 1880 US Federal Census, are spotty at best.

I believe I did find him in state historical records which included the listing of businesses in Mineral City, White Pine County, Nevada in 1874 as “MITCHEL & LYONS – Lived at this time at what was later known as the OLE HANSON ranch.” Today, Mineral City is listed as a former populated place located along US highway 50. A former mining boom town founded in 1869 with a population of about 600 by 1872. (1)

It was just west of Ely, Nevada, and named Mineral City until 1876. It was the first mining camp in the Robinson District. Since Mineral City lay on the Central Overland Route, a stagecoach stop followed, and by 1872, the boomtown had a post office, a ten-stamp mill, mercantile stores, an express office, six saloons, hotels, four boarding houses, restaurants, livery stables, and a blacksmith shop. In 1896 the town was renamed Lane City for Charles D. Lane, following his purchase of Chainman, a major local mining and milling operation. It continued into the twentieth century, but as of 2014 the town (lying along what is now US 50) is abandoned and only a few structures and foundations remain. (2 & 3) Remember that William G. Lyons was one of the locators of the Chainman Mine. A locator was one who locates and establishes a mining claim.

He did quite well in the mining industry and in the 1880 Census for Ward, White Pine County, Nevada, his occupation is listed as Mine Superintendent. In 1883 he was the postmaster of the post office in Taylor in White Pine County, Nevada. Also see further down his business dealings in 1886 with W. N. McGill. In the 1900 Census for Ely, White Pine County, Nevada, his occupation is listed as Capitalist, he is living alone, and he owns his home free and clear. He is listed in the White Pine Newspaper several times in the listings of registered voters.

Luckily, his obituary also tells us a bit more about him as a person. He is described as one of the most kind-hearted and generous of bachelors, and while his presence will be greatly missed from among us, still his many kind deeds and acts of benevolence shall live forever after in the minds of scores he has be-friended.

Also, according to his obituary, he always enjoyed good health until two years prior to his death, but the early vicissitudes of pioneer life began to tell upon him and, although he sought restoration in the climate of California and Arizona, it was to no avail. He died at Stone’s Sanitarium in Phoenix, Arizona. He appears to have died of tuberculosis. His mining and capitalists’ ventures left him well off financially for only affluent patients were cared for at these sanitariums in Pheonix.

William G. Lyons headstone found in Downs Cemetery.

The last view lines of his obituary tell us about his living relatives and that he only had two known living relatives, his two sisters Henrietta Frances “Nettie” Lyons Armstrong and Martha A. Knight Lyons Armstrong both of Kansas. Actually, his sister Nettie at the time of his death was living in Milford, Clemont County, Ohio, but Martha was living in Kansas. His remains were shipped to Kansas, and his final resting place is found in Downs Cemetery in Osbourne County, Kansas.

A final note, I did find in the White Pine Newspaper for July 28, 1904, a notice of hearing of petition for probate of the will and for issuance of letters of testamentary in the matter of the Estate of William G. Lyons. W. N. McGill filed a petition for the probate of the last will of William G. Lyons.

William Neil “Billy” McGill. Business partner of William G. Lyons.

I have been unable as of yet to view the last will and testament of William G. Lyons. But researching W. N. McGill, it appears they were in business together. W. N. McGill’s full name was William Neil McGill. In the 1900 Census for Ely, White Pine County, Nevada, he is listed as a farmer, albeit a quite well to do farmer, with a wife and several children, as well as a servant and several employees. By 1910 he is a widower and living with him are his sister, several of his adult children, a daughter-in-law and a granddaughter, as well as two servants. His occupation is now listed as Stock Grower.

On the Nevada Adventures website of exploring ghost towns and mining camps in Nevada, I was able to find the following: William Neil McGill and his partner, William Lyons, bought Cowger’s Ranch in 1886, and soon the ranch was one of the most prosperous in the county [White Pine County]. Lyons had been the co-discoverer of Taylor in 1885, and because of his interests there, he sold out to McGill in late 1886. (4) 

John Cowger established Cowger’s Ranch in 1872 and soon had extensive grain fields. By 1880 he had become the sole owner of the area’s water rights. An unsubstantiated rumor has it that Jesse James and his gang ate there while escaping from a sheriff’s posse. (4)

In 1886, William Neil McGill acquired full control of the ranch, and along with former Nevada governor Jewett Adams began one of the largest livestock operations in the state. Their strong partnership continued into the 20th century, until Adams died in June 1920, followed by McGill in April 1923, after which their empire fell. (5)

On the death certificate of William McGill of March of 1923, it states he was the manager of Adams & McGill Co., and the nature of the industry is listing as raising of silver stocks. He is found in the Who’s Who of the Pacific Coast, 1913, and it states he was Pres. of Campton Commercial Co., Ely Packing Co.; member of firm, Adam & McGill; Dir. First Nat’l Bank of Ely, Natl. Copper Bank of Salt Lake.

William G. Lyons and William Neil “Billy” McGill may have known each other in Ohio, as well as their business dealings in Nevada. Both the families lived in Miami County, Ohio and both had family connections to Hamilton County, Ohio and further back to New Jersey.

Whereas William Neil “Billy” McGill is listed in the Who’s Who and written up in newspapers for perseverance and its importance as a “must” to survive, and his many accomplishments, William G. Lyons, who was also quite successful in his financial ventures, was remembered for his kindness, generosity, and friendships.

References:

  1. Mineral City, Robinson Mining District, White Pine Co., Nevada, USA at Mindat.org which is run by the not-for-profit Hudson Institute of Mineralogy.
  2. Lane City, Nevada. Greatbasinheritage.org via Internet Archive.
  3. Lane City/Mineral City, Nevada. wikipedia.org.
  4. McGill (Smelter) (Axhandle Springs). nevadadventures.com.
  5. McGill, White Pine County nvexpeditions.com.

If you’d like to learn more about the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks project, please visit here:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

Or join the Facebook group Generations Cafe.

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

Posted in 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Genealogy | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Five of My Grandfather’s Siblings – All Broken Branches. Premature Death, Never Able to Bloom and Grow into Adulthood. 52 Ancestors, Week 25: Broken Branch.

Broken tree branch on a headstone.

The 52 Ancestors writing theme this week is Broken Branch. This is the meaning of a broken tree or broken tree branch in family trees and on headstones; a tree represents life, a broken tree, or a broken branch, symbolizes death, or more specifically a life cut short. This symbolism is usually used on headstones, to signify a break in the family tree, someone who died an untimely or premature death. Usually seen on a younger person’s gravestone, an alternate symbol is a broken flower bud, or rose stem.  A broken tree at the trunk usually represents the loss of a family patriarch. (1)

Broken flowers engraved on headstone.

Most commonly the hanging flower bud is used on headstones of children who died an untimely or premature death.  The broken rose or flower bud or stem represents the flower that did not bloom into full blossom, the life that was cut short before it had a chance to grow to adulthood.  The three leaves on the rose stem represent the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. (2)

My grandfather Durward Edward Cole was the son of Joseph Edward Cole and Anna Cora Prindle. He had three siblings that lived into adulthood and married, although only one of his siblings, Jesse Cole, had children, so my Mom only had three Cole first cousins.

My grandfather had a total of eight siblings. Five of his siblings are broken branches on the family tree. These five siblings died young.

This is what is known about the five siblings who lives were cut short before they could grow and bloom into adulthood.

The first broken branch of his siblings is Mabel. The most is known about her. Mabel R. Cole was born 10 February 1896 in Dekalb County, Indiana. Her parents separated and divorced by 1910. She is found in the 1910 census in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, living with her maternal aunt Ona Belle Prindle and her aunt’s second husband Charles Danner, and her first cousin Helen J. Danner.

The House of the Good Shepherd, Detroit, Michigan – 1910.

Within a year after she is found in the 1910 census she is living in The House of the Good Shepherd (aka Sisters of the Good Shepherd Girls Reformatory). The Sisters of the Good Shepherd opened their Detroit house in 1883. The House was located on Fort Street West and the property took up an entire block. Although orphans were sent here, it was mostly a girl’s reformatory school. The home was not endowed, and the Good Sisters depended on their work and the charitably disposed for maintenance of the house. In 1920 the Sisters were looking after 500 girls. 

Mabel’s childhood was one of dysfunction with alcohol abuse within the family, she had to deal with her parent’s drama and fighting (which was at least partly chronicled in the local newspaper in Indiana), their divorce and her mother leaving her younger children with family members. As well as the fact that she was a teenager, which at any time in history can be a difficult time.

Mabel’s final resting place at Mount Elliott Cemetery in Detroit, Michigan. She has no headstone, but a grave marker tells us she is buried in this section.

According to her death certificate she died at The House of the Good Shephard on 5 September 1912 at the age of sixteen of Acute Nephritis which can come on quite suddenly. Nephritis is an old word for what is called Glomerulonephritis today. The causes are often a viral or bacterial infection, especially streptococcal bacteria. Easily treatable today, that was not the case in 1912. Symptoms Mabel would have experienced include blood in the urine (red or brown pee), fluid buildup in the tissues which engenders swelling around the face, eyes, ankles, legs, and belly, high blood pressure, headaches, nausea and vomiting. (3) Not a pleasant way to die.

I am a cradle Catholic that had a good experience with the religious Sisters that were my teachers, but I am not naive, I know that homes like this one would have had a large population of girls in comparison to the number of Sisters and other workers to take care of them. Abuse and neglect also happened. Some of the girls were prostitutes, others just considered problem children and teens, others were orphans, and often they were not believed if they said they were ill until it was too late. Mabel was under the care of a physician for only one day before her death. Whether neglect and/or abuse played a part in her death is information lost to time, but it is quite possible, along with lack of treatments available for her ailment at this time.

Divine Comfort by artist Heather V. Kreiter.

The second broken branch was a baby boy that only lived one day. He was born on 11 May 1898 in DeKalb County, Indiana, he died the next day on the 12th of May. He was not named and his place of burial in DeKalb County, Indiana is unknown.

Gladys Cole is on the right, her Prindle 1st Cousin Neva North is on left. Ashley, Dekalb County, Indiana.

The third broken branch is Gladys Cole. The photo above is the only known photo of Gladys Cole. She is on the right, her Prindle 1st Cousin Neva North is on the left. Gladys was born on 1 November 1902 in DeKalb County, Indiana. She died on 8 May 1910 at the age of seven. I was told by my Uncle George Cole that her death greatly affected the family, especially her father, for Gladys was his favorite. Her place of death is not known but was probably in DeKalb County, Indiana. I have been unable to find her mother Anna Cora Prindle Cole in the 1910 census. Her father is found in the April 1910 census of Detroit, Michigan living with his twenty-two-year-old son Jesse Cole. They are both listed as lodgers. Gladys is not living with him. Gladys may have been living with extended family and died before the census was taken in that area. Her final resting place is unknown. But if she died in DeKalb County, Indiana, she was probably buried there. There are numerous family members and ancestors buried in cemeteries in DeKalb County.

The fourth broken branch is Ida Cole. She was born 20 November 1906 in Allen County, Indiana. She died prior to 1910, so would have been under age three with she died. She died in Indiana; her final resting place is unknown.

Birth certificate of Carl Cole.

The fifth broken branch is Carl Cole. He was born on 19 February 1909 in Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana. He died at age 6 1/2 months in September 1909 in Indiana. His final resting place is unknown.

I wanted to take this week’s writings to remember my three grandaunts; Mabel, Gladys, and Ida, and my two granduncles; Carl and an infant baby boy, that all died young. Broken branches in my family tree.

Gone but not forgotten by me, your grandniece. My hope is that family members and others reading this, in doing so will remember these little ones taken before their time, leaving the earthly plane before their lives were fully lived. May they always have an angel by their side in heaven.

References:

  1. Meaning of a Broken Tree or Branch. City of Grove, Oklahoma website.
  2. Meaning of a Broken Flower Stem. City of Grove, Oklahoma website.
  3. Glomerulonephritis (GN). ClevelandClinic.org.
Broken Rose © 2011 Jens Schott Knudsen

If you’d like to learn more about the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks project, please visit here:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

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The First Name Tacy. 34+ Women named Tacy in my Family Tree! 52 Ancestors, Week 24: Popular Name.

This week’s 52 Ancestors writing theme is “Popular Name”. This could include ancestors that have a name that was popular or trendy at the time, or a name that keeps getting used in your family tree. I decided to write about the female first name Tacy.

Icon of my ancestor Tacy Cooper Hubbard by artist GC Myers. He also is a descendant of hers.

The original ancestor that engendered the name Tacy to be passed down to numerous of her descendants was Tacy Cooper. She is my (twice) 9th great-grandmother. She was born 23 February 1618 in England and died 27 September 1697 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Rev. Samuel Hubbard.

The parentage of Tacy Cooper is unknown and unproven. But she and her husband were originally members of the Congregational Church. The origins of Congregationalism are found in 16th-century Puritanism.

Although the name Tacy can be a nickname for Eustacia or Anastasia, her name is only found listed as Tacy (and misspelled as Tasy on occasion). It was passed down to numerous descendants as Tacy, never as a nickname for Eustacia or Anastasia. Tacy is an English name that means “fruitful”. Tacy is also a name used by Puritans that means silence, it is from the Latin tace for “Be quiet!” It was in use in the 16th century, though usage of the name died out two centuries later. But as you will see the name did not die out in usage among the descendants of Tacy Cooper Hubbard. Even in the beginning of the 20th century, 200+ years after her death, I found one of her descendants named Tacy after her!

The name Tacy was passed down at least 34 times to the descendants of Tacy Cooper Hubbard. These are just the ones I know about! I am sure there are more than 34 if I were to follow every single one of her descendancy lines down to the 20th century. I descend from two daughters of Rev. Samuel Hubbard and Tacy Cooper: Ruth Hubbard who married Robert Burdick and Bethia Hubbard who married Rev. Joseph Clarke, Jr. (Seventh Day Baptist clergyman).

I am including a brief biography of she and her husband below, but further down I have included the list of her 34 known descendants named after her. This list includes two of my direct ancestors, several siblings of my direct ancestors, and oodles of cousins.

Tacy Cooper’s husband Samuel Hubbard arrived in Salem, Massachusetts, in October 1633, and probably came in the ship “James”, which left Gravesend, England, late in August of 1633, and arrived in Massachusetts Bay in October. He says in his diary, “I was born of good parents. My Mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord, in Mendlesham, in catechizing me and hearing choice ministers.”

In 1635, he moved to Watertown, Massachusetts, where he joined the [Congregational] church and that same year he went to Dorchester (Windsor), Connecticut. where he married Tacy Cooper.


Samuel and Tacy went to Wethersfield, Connecticut, in 1637, and moved up the Connecticut River to Springfield, Massachuetts in 1639. In December 1640 “Samuel Hubbard is alsoe appoynted by a generall vote to keepe an Ordinary [Inn] for ye entertaynment of Strangers.”

They left for Fairfield, Connecticut, in 1647, though only stayed a short time due to church disagreements. Samuel and Tacy were preaching the doctrines of Anabaptism. He says in his diary: “God having enlightened both (but mostly my wife) into his holy ordinance of baptising only of visible believers, and being very zealous for it, she was mostly struck at, and answered two terms publicly, where I was said to be as bad as she, and sore threatened with imprisonment to Hartford jail, if not to renounce it or to remove: that scripture came into our minds.”

“If they persecute you in one place flee to another;” and so we did 2nd day of October 1648. We went for Rhode Island and arrived there the 12th day. I and my wife upon our manifestation of our faith were baptised by brother Joseph Clarke, 3rd day of November 1648.

Samuel was a zealous Baptist and public religious disputant. For twenty-three years he belonged to the First Baptist Church of Newport, which sent him to Boston in 1651 “to visit the bretherin who was imprisoned in Boston jayl for witnessing the truth of baptising believers only, viz : Brothers John Clarke, Obadiah Holmes, and John Crandall.” In 1657 he went with Holmes on a preaching tour on Long Island, and in 1664 he was appointed General Solicitor of the Colony.

In about 1665, a Seventh Day Baptist missionary and his wife arrived in Newport from London; the first convert to the Sabbath in America being Tacy Cooper Hubbard. Samuel and Tacy, one daughter, and four other persons formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America in 1671. Samuel reported that in 1678 there were 37 “Sabbatarians” in America; 20 in Newport, 7 at Westerly (also known as Hopkinton) and 10 at New London, Connecticut. Three years later the number of members reached 51; of this group two were Indians.

In 1675 in his diary, he refers to a “testament of my grandfather Cocke’s, printed in 1549, which he [Cocke] hid in his bed straw lest it should be found and burned in Queen Mary’s days.”

Samuel was born to Dissenter parents in Mendlesham, England in 1610. Samuel’s grandfather, Thomas Hubbard was driven out of the town of Mendlesham in 1556 for believing that Scripture contained enough information on its own to teach necessary doctrine to be saved.


He died between 1688 and 1692, and his wife after 1697, but no traces of their burial places have been found.

Source for biography:

One Thousand years of Hubbard History: 1866 – 1895
Published by Harlan Page Hubbard, New York. 1895.
Shope Family Ancestors

All the woman below are descendants of my ancestor, my twice 9th great-grandmother, Tacy Cooper Hubbard:

Tacy Crandall, my 5th great-grandmother, born 1721 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, and died 1 June 1795 in White Day Creek, Monongalia County, West Virginia. She married Rev. Thomas William Davis (clergyman in the Seventh-Day Baptist church).

Tacy Kennedy, my 3rd great grandaunt, born about 1782 in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, she died young. She was a sibling of my 3rd great-grandfather John Kennedy.

Tacy Davis, my 4th great grandaunt, born in 1761 Shrewsbury, Monmouth, New Jersey, and married Thomas S. Palmer. She was sibling of my 4th great-grandmother Ruth Davis Kennedy.

Tacy Burdick, my 7th great grandaunt, born 2 December 1677 in Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, she married Rev. Joseph Maxson (Seventh-Day Baptist clergyman), I am also related to him, he is my 7th great-granduncle.

Tacy Crandall, my 6th great grandaunt, born 1692 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married John Lewis.

Tacy Davis, my 1st cousin, 5 times removed, born 1 September 1774 Monmouth, New Jersey, she died as a baby in 1775.

Tacy B. Davis, my 1st cousin, 5 times removed, born 25 June 1801 in Harrison, Charles, Virginia, she married Joseph Jeffrey Jr.

Tacy Davis, my 1st cousin, 6 times removed, born 13 July 1766 in Hopkinton, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Nathaniel Kenyon.

Tacy Wells born 4 January 1715 in Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island, she married Hubbard Burdick.

Tacy Saunders born 4 February 1722 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married John Allen.

Tacy Maxson born 15 December 1728 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Jonathan Lewis.

Tacy Burdick born 11 September 1735 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island.

Tacy Lewis born 29 September 1743 in Charlestown, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Benjamin Cahoon Card.

Tacy Stillman born 14 April 1755 in Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Stephen Saunders.

Tacy Clark born 3 June 1756 Kingston, Rhode Island, she married Benedict Crandall.

Tacy Crandall born 30 November 1769 in Rhode Island, she married Samuel Crumb.

Tacy Lanphier born 14 May 1770 born Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Ethan Allen Maxson.

Tacy Langworthy born 1 Jul 1773 in Hopkinton, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Charles Babcock.

Tacy Lewis born 14 January 1790 Westerly, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Nathiel Tanner.

Tacy Crandall born 8 September 1798 Washington County, Rhode Island, she married William Scriven.

Tacy C. Card born 17 February 1807 in Richmond, Washington County, Rhode Island, married Seventh-Day Baptist clergyman Weeden Barber.

Tacy Ann Gilkeson born 1819 in Pennsylvania, she married William MacIntosh

Tacy Lucinda Greene born 7 December 1820 in Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Thomas Taylor Larkin.

Tacy Ann Greene born 18 October 1822 in North Stonington, New London, Connecticut, she married James Jerome Crandall.

Tacy Ann Maxson born 12 October 1825 in Washington County, Rhode Island, died four years later and is buried in Hopkinton, Washington County, Rhode Island.

Tacy M. Scriven born 17 September 1829 in Rensselaer County, New York, she married James Carroll Schullin.

Tacy Ann Palmer born 4 January 1831 in Rhode Island.

Tacy Jane Jeffrey born 28 February 1833 in West Union, Harrison, West Virginia, she married Elisha Hall.

Tacy Noyes born 7 November 1844 in Hopkinton, Washington County, Rhode Island, she died aged 19 in 1864.

Tacie Elizabeth Larkin born 31 Jul 1858 in Hopkinton, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Alberti Randolph Stillman.

Helen Tacy Ann MacIntosh born 18 February 1865 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, she never married, she died at age 52 in 1918.

Tacy Ann MacIntosh born 16 November 1896 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, she married Earl Chester Fuhrman.

Tacy Angeline Crandall born 19 July 1902 in Ashaway, Washington County, Rhode Island, she married Dr. Walter Saretzki (Chiropractor).

Famous Kin of Rev. Samuel Hubbard and Tacy Cooper:

  1. John Batterson Stetson, Inventor of the Cowboy Hat.
  2. Harry Chapin, Singer and Songwriter.
  3. Mary Chapin Carpenter, Singer and Songwriter.
  4. Billy Gilman, Country Music and Pop Singer.
  5. Cash Warren, TV Producer.
  6. Amy Adams, Movie Actress.

My two direct lines of descent from Tacy Cooper:

  1. Tacy Cooper and Rev. Samuel Hubbard (son of Yoeman James Hubbard and Naomi Cooke (Cocke)).
  2. Ruth Hubbard and Robert Burdick.
  3. Debora Burdick and Rev. Joseph Crandall (son of John Crandall (the elder) and his first wife).
  4. John F. Crandall and Mary Yeomans (daughter of Samuel Yeomans and Mary Ellis).
  5. Tacy Crandall and Rev. Thomas William Davis (son of Rev. John Davis and Elizabeth Maxson).
  6. Ruth Davis and Dennis Kennedy (son of John Kennedy and Sarah Murray).
  7. John Kennedy and Jane Williams (daughter of Zachariah Williams and Elizabeth Swartzlander).
  8. John Davis Kennedy and Susan Palmer (daughter of John Palmer and Mary Ann Spots (Spatz)).
  9. Abraham G. Kennedy and Mary Elizabeth Price (daughter of James Price and Julia Ann Meteer/Mateer).
  10. Glenna Annette Kennedy and Durward Edward Cole (son of Joseph Cole and Anna Cora Prindle) – my maternal grandparents.
  1. Tacy Cooper and Rev. Samuel Hubbard (son of Yoeman James Hubbard and Naomi Cooke (Cocke)).
  2. Bethia Hubbard and Rev. Joseph Clarke, Jr. (son of Rev. Joseph Clarke, Sr. and Margaret Turner).
  3. Judith Clarke and Rev. John M. Maxson, Jr. (son of Rev. John M. Maxson, Sr. and Mary ___).
  4. Elizabeth Maxson and Rev. John Davis (son of Rev. William Davis and Elizabeth May Brisley).
  5. Rev. Thomas William Davis and Tacy Crandall (daughter of John F. Crandall and Mary Yeomans).
  6. Ruth Davis and Dennis Kennedy (son of John Kennedy and Sarah Murray)
  7. John Kennedy and Jane Williams (daughter of Zachariah Williams and Elizabeth Swartzlander).
  8. John Davis Kennedy and Susan Palmer (daughter of John Palmer and Mary Ann Spots (Spatz)).
  9. Abraham G. Kennedy and Mary Elizabeth Price (daughter of James Price and Julia Ann Meteer/Mateer).
  10. Glenna Annette Kennedy and Durward Edward Cole (son of Joseph Edward Cole and Anna Cora Prindle) – my maternal grandparents.

Please see my other blog post related to these and related family lines and to learn all about them: My Davis, Maxson, Crandall, Burdick, and related lines, in Wales, England, and Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, New Jersey.

Links for further reading about my ancestors Rev. Samuel Hubbard and Tacy Cooper:

  1. Samuel and Tacy Hubbard: A Couple Devoted to God’s Sabbath by Rev. Don A. Sanford. Sabbath Recorder, Council on History.
  2. Icon: Tacy Cooper at redtreetimes.com. Concerning the work of artist GC Myers, who is also a descendant of Tacy Cooper Hubbard.

If you’d like to learn more about the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks project, please visit here:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

Or join the Facebook group Generations Cafe.

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

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My Ancestor James McTeer (Mateer) from Kilkeel, Down, N. Ireland. Lived in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. Related lines. 52 Ancestors, Week 22: Conflict.

I wrote this blog entry ten days early and am updating it today. Tomorrow the prompt for 52 Ancestors, Week 22 will be Conflict. I am interpreting this week’s prompt to mean conflicting records, conflicting family trees, etc. In this case it was partly engendered by the family passing the name James onto not only one of his sons but also numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren of my immigrant ancestor James McTeer (Mateer) from Kilkeel, Down, N. Ireland. Also, I must add that hundreds of people repeating and sharing incorrect information in their family trees and elsewhere on the Internet has also contributed to the confusion regarding my direct line. I have endeavored, using various records and DNA, to attempt to resolve the conflicting information and present my conclusions.

After getting the actual prompt this past Tuesday, it’s supposed to be directly related to a conflict as in a military conflict, but it still is applicable for my James McTeer (Mateer) and his sons service during the French and Indian War. I have included information about their military service further down.

But firstly, I wanted to share some biographical information regarding my immigrant ancestor James McTeer (Mateer) to set the foundation for the sharing of the details of my research into identifying and placing correctly his descendants named James, especially my direct line, and the outcome of my labors.

My ancestor James McTeer was born about 1697 in Kilkeel, County Down, Ireland (now N. Ireland).

Kilkeel (Encyclopædia Britannica)
Cottages near the beach, with the Mourne Mountains in the distance, Kilkeel, Newry and Mourne, N. Ireland.

A bit about Kilkeel:

Kilkeel, Irish Cill Chaoil, it is a fishing port and seaside resort in southeastern Northern Ireland. It lies at the mouth of the River Kilkeel at the foot of the Mourne Mountains. (1) It is the southernmost town in Northern Ireland.  Kilkeel town is the main fishing port on the County Down coast, and its harbor is home to the largest fishing fleet in Northern Ireland. It had a population of 6,541 people at the 2011 Census. The town contains the ruins of a 14th-century church and fort, winding streets and terraced shops. (2, 3, 4, & 5)

Sometime about 1730 James McTeer left Northern Ireland with a wife and family. On shipboard his children fell ill and died one by one, then his wife succumbed to illness as well; so, the grief-stricken young man arrived alone in Pennsylvania. This same traditional story has been handed down from generation to generation in both Tennessee and Ohio. Though the story is essentially the same in both branches, the number, sex, and names of the children vary, and no one has presumed to suggest a name or identity for this first wife. (8 & 9)

The first record of James McTeer was his application for a grant of land in 1747 in what was then known as Lancaster County, “West Side, Beyond the River Susquehanna” which eventually became Cumberland County, Pennsylvania in 1750. In 1736, the Penn family had signed a treaty with the Indians to open up the land on the west side of the river. The connection of the McTeers with the founding of the early Presbyterian Congregation of Silver Springs in 1736 indicates that they were residents of this area in the early 1730’s. (6 & 9)

Once settled in British Colonial America, he married second to Margaret Anderson about 1731 in Allen, Cumberland, Pennsylvania. It is believed he married third to Molly Sharon.

At least three generations of McTeers were elders in the Silver Spring Presbyterian Church in Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. The church was founded in 1736. James McTeer was one of a group of forty-two members who, in the early years of the church signed notes to cover past church indebtedness and to guarantee the salary of the pastor.

Silver Spring Presbyterian Church and Cemetery
Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania.

History of Silver Spring Presbyterian Church:

Scots-Irish settlers who traveled west across the Susquehanna River in search of new beginnings can be credited for establishing the Silver Spring Presbyterian Church, located at 444 Silver Spring Road. Attracted by the region’s fertile soil and natural beauty, they made the decision to put down roots.

According to church records, the settlers, who embraced Presbyterianism, held their first worship meeting in 1732. Two years later, Alexander Craighead was appointed to preach to the people “over the river,” and by 1735, the first “Meiting House” was constructed on the land near the spring. It was described as a “small log building, roughly built, with split-log floors and seats, and few, if any, windows.”

By 1757, the area was officially organized and became known as Silver Spring Township. James Silver’s spring is still accessible from the north side of today’s “Meiting House,” where water is routinely used for baptisms.

In 1782, the Rev. Samuel Waugh was named the first American-born pastor to be licensed by the Donegal Presbytery. He lived with his wife, Eliza Hoge, daughter of David Hoge, one of Silver Spring Township’s founding trustees, in a small limestone house adjacent to the church property, which is now being used by the church as a retreat center. Waugh, educated at Princeton, served the church for 25 years until he died at the age of 58. (7)

Soon after completing his title to the property with a patent dated 11 Nov.1760, James McTeer built a store house near a large flowing spring, probably at about the point where Lisburn Road crosses Cedar Run. A Cumberland County map of the 1860s shows at that time seven houses on what had been the original McTeer land grant. (8 & 9)

Records of the Pennsylvania Direct Tax of 1798 for Allen Twp., Cumberland County, list James McTeer’s original house then owned and occupied by his son Samuel McTeer, as a stone dwelling, 16 by 22 feet, one story with four windows containing 48 lights (panes of glass); the accompanying kitchen was shown as an outbuilding 16 by 12 feet with two windows containing 12 lights; and the whole property including two acres of land was valued at $600.

When Major Will A. McTeer of Maryville, Tenn., visited the locality a century later this house was still standing and still owned by a McTeer descendant, Mrs. Ellen Saxton. The Major wrote his impressions in a letter from Mechanicsburg, dated 30 July 1898; “We got here last night. A beautiful town of five thousand inhabitants, nestled down in the richest and loveliest little valley I have ever seen. I am just now back from a visit to the old homestead of my great, great grandfather, four miles out. The main part of the old stone house is still standing but very old and dilapidated. The old farm is of the very best. A barn as big as Texas … filled … with oats by the six-horse load. I drank from the old spring that slaked the thirst of my ancestors.”

But only a few weeks after this encounter the old place was torn down; so, a neighboring farmer could use the stones for the foundation of a milk station. In Mrs. Saxton’s words, “It was hard for me to make up my mind to it but thought it best to lay sentiment aside as it was getting unsightly and useless and possibly dangerous.” (8 & 9)

James McTeer was elected a captain (during the French and Indian War) in the Cumberland County, Pennsylvania Associators, 10,000 volunteer militiamen formed into 120 companies throughout Pennsylvania and commissioned by the governor. They were called Associated Regiments and they continued for the next 30 years until the Revolutionary War. His son, John, also raised a company of Associators in the Silver Springs community and was elected captain and served in the Revolutionary War. In fact, five of James Mateer’s sons and three of his son-in-laws served with the Pennsylvania troops at various times during the war. (6)

Out of his 400 acres James McTeer provided a farm for each of his four sons who remained in Allen Township. On 8 Dec 1770 “for love and affection” he deeded 100 acres to his son John; on 21 December 1770 he made a similar conveyance to his son William: and by his will he also gave land to sons James and Samuel. Son Robert moved to Fermanagh Township, Cumberland County, soon after his marriage and had already gone on to Tennessee before his father’s death. Since he received in the will only a token legacy, it is clear that Robert had in some way received his share at an earlier date, but the nature of that inheritance is now past recovery. (8 & 9)

His will was probated March 16, 1785, and Samuel McTeer was the executor. He died in his 89th year making the date of his birth about 1697.

Known children of James McTeer and Margaret Anderson:

  1. James McTeer (Mateer) born 6 April 1732 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died 12 October 1803 in Allen, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He married Elizabeth Donaldson (also listed as Denelson/Donelson) who was the daughter of Jacob Donaldson.
  2. Elizabeth McTeer (Mateer) born 9 April 1734 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died 18 May 1805. She married William Boyd.
  3. Capt. John McTeer (Mateer) born 30 April 1736 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died 10 April 1790. He married Mary Huston.
  4. William McTeer (Mateer) born 2 December 1738 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died August 1819 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He married Margaret Carothers.
  5. Robert Montgomery McTeer (Mateer) born 25 January 1740 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died 6 April 1824 in Blount, Tennessee. He married Agnes Ann Martin.

Some list him as marrying third to Molly Sharon. There were Sharon families in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania that were also from Ulster, Ireland (now N. Ireland). The following children are variously listed as children with his second wife and also sometimes as with his third wife:

  1. Alice (Elsie) McTeer (Mateer) born 17 March 1746 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died in 1804. She married John Carruthers/Carothers.
  2. Sarah McTeer born 19 April 1749 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died before 1810 in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. She married John Pauley.
  3. Samuel Mateer (McTeer) born 12 April 1752 in Allen Township, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died September 1800 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He married Rosannah Quigley.

The next generation or two down, there is great confusion online regarding my James Mateer (McTeer) who married Elizabeth Nelson, and his parentage. Hundreds of people have copied incorrect information and parentage for him. Below I discuss the sons of James McTeer (Mateer) and his grandchildren named James and how my ancestor fits and doesn’t fit with each.

My James Mateer (McTeer) was not the son of William Mateer (McTeer). Many list him as the son of Willliam Mateer and Dorcas McClure. There was a Dorcas McClure McTeer (Minteer) that is in probate records, witnessing wills in Harrison County, Kentucky, and would be attached to the McTeer lines that migrated to Kentucky. This is not the same Dorcas Mateer that is listed as a witness in some wills in Pennsylvania. Some list William Mateer as marrying both Margaret Carruthers and Dorcas McClure. There is a Dorcas McClure McTeer found in probate records in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, but they don’t match the death date for the William McTeer that married Margaret Carruthers. There were McClure families in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and this same Dorcas is listed in the will of a Joseph McClure. I have not attempted to work out the relationship of these two women named Dorcas McClure who married into the same McTeer (Mateer) family. There appears to also be a Dorcas Mateer (McTeer) who never married that is found in the Pennsylvania records and is sometimes confused with the women named Dorcas McClure Mateer (McTeer).

I have zero direct DNA connections to this McClure family of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. I have three DNA matches that are descendants of the McClure family of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, one is a confirmed maternal Palmer related match, the second is related to me on my paternal Doughty or related lines, the third only matches to me and our connection is unknown. My sister has two DNA matches to descendants of this McClure family of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, she shares the same Palmer related match with me, and the second one is only a match to her but appears to have a maternal Prindle/Greatsinger connection and as a side note, my sister’s second match is my distant paternal Doty/Doughty cousin! My niece has zero DNA matches to descendants of this same McClure family. My Kennedy 2nd cousin has two DNA matches to this McClure family and both are non-related Johnson connection matches.

I do have some distant DNA connections to the Carothers family, but there were a few intermarriages with the same McTeer and Carothers families.

William McTeer and Margaret Carothers did have a son named James Mateer (McTeer) who was born 1 November 1765 in Pennsylvania, and died 23 May 1832 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. This James McTeer (Mateer) married Elizabeth Ross, the daughter of William Ross and Jean Nisbet. I do have distant DNA connections to the children of James Mateer (McTeer) and Elizabeth Ross.

My James Mateer (McTeer) also was not the son of Capt. John McTeer (Mateer) who married Mary Huston. This couple also did have a son named James! This James McTeer was called James “of Liburn” McTeer and was born about 1760 in Pennsylvania, and died 3 November 1817 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. I have found no marriage records for him. I do have some distant DNA matches to the descendants of the other children of John McTeer and Mary Huston.

My James Mateer (McTeer) also was not the son of Robert Montgomery McTeer who married Agnes Ann Martin and migrated to Blount, Tennessee. But of course, this couple also had a son named James! This James McTeer was born about 1763 in Pennsylvania, and died 26 September 1825 in Blount County, Tennessee, he married Martha Ferguson. I do have distant DNA matches to the descendants of Robert Montgomery McTeer and Agnes Ann Martin.

My James Mateer (McTeer) was also not a son of Samuel Mateer (McTeer) and Rosannah Quigley. Firstly, Samuel Mateer (McTeer) was only a few years younger than my James Mateer (McTeer). Of course, once again this couple did have a son named James! This James Mateer was born about 1780 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died 25 October 1856 near Georgetown, Fairfax, Virginia. He married Eliza Ann Tynan. I do have distant DNA matches to the descendants of Samuel Mateer (McTeer) and Rosannah Quigley.

The only son left is James McTeer. Once again there is great confusion as to the name of the spouse of this James McTeer who was the son of James McTeer (Mateer) and Margaret Anderson. He did marry a woman named Elizabeth, that is not contested, they share a cemetery headstone. Her name is listed as Elizabeth D. Mateer, the D. stood for her maiden name which was Donaldson (also listed as Denelson/Donelson). This is confirmed by research done by many prior to the invention of the Internet. But this fact has been largely ignored. Instead, people try to marry him to his future daughter-in-law Elizabeth Nelson! Some changing it to DeNelson (with no documentation to back up a DeNelson surname, just an attempt to explain the “D.” on her headstone).

Marriages of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania from 1749-1783.

Although hundreds of family trees on Ancestry.com, also the information on FindAGrave.com (and elsewhere all over the web) try to list Elizabeth Donaldson (Denelson/Donelson) Mateer as Elizabeth D. Nelson Mateer. It is very much a case of them trying to fit a square peg into a circle! Elizabeth Nelson and James Meteer/Mateer married 17 Feb 1780 in East Pennsboro, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. I have seen some change the year of their marriage to 1760 to try to force it all to fit incorrectly!

Elizabeth Donaldson was the daughter of Jacob Donaldson. My sister, my niece, my Kennedy 2nd Cousin, and I, all share DNA matches to descendants of Jacob Donaldson who was born in Ireland (now N. Ireland) and died in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania.

There is a group of Pennsylvania Donaldson lines that appear to be connected and thought to be siblings (I do have DNA matches to the descendants of some of these lines).

  1. Jacob Donaldson of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, who married Janet (name also listed as Jennet). (My ancestors).
  2. Andrew Donaldson of Bedford County, Pennsylvania.
  3. James Donaldson of Pennsylvania.
  4. David Donaldson of Hopewell, Pennsylvania.

James McTeer, the son of James McTeer (Mateer) and Margaret Anderson, who married Elizabeth Donaldson and died 12 October 1803 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, did leave a will and in it is listed his son James McTeer (Mateer) – my ancestor.

My ancestor James McTeer (Mateer), the son of James McTeer and Elizabeth Donaldson, was born about 1757 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died in 1822 in Union Township, Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. As noted above, he married 17 February 1780 in East Pennsboro, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania to Elizabeth Nelson, the daughter of Robert Nelson.

The surname is found various ways in addition to McTeer, Meteer and Mateer, including Matier, Minteer, Matteer, Mintre, Minater, Mintier.

Below are the known proven children of James McTeer (Mateer) and Elizabeth Nelson:

  1. Robert Meteer (Mateer) born 25 Oct 1781 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He died 6 Dec 1849 in Monday Creek, Perry County, Ohio. He married Esther Chambers on 11 Dec 1817 in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. She was born 25 July 1790 in Centre County, Pennsylvania and died 16 July 1876 in Monday Creek, Perry County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Pvt. Elijah Chambers and Mary Linaberry (Lindaberry). They are my direct ancestors.
  2. William Mateer born about 1783 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died before 1870 in Clarion, Clarion, Pennsylvania. He married Eliza Eskill, and Martha Donnelly.
  3. Isabelle (Isabella) Meteer born 12 June 1784 in Pennsylvania, and died 25 October 1860 in Fairfield County, Ohio. She married Robert Work.
  4. Dorcas Mateer born about 1785 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died 1825 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania. It appears she never married.
  5. Jennet (Jennette) Mateer/Meteer born 1786 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and died 1 January 1861 in Mahoning County, Ohio. She married William Steele. (She passed on the maiden name of her mother Nelson as a first name of her son).
  6. Joseph M. Mateer born 1789 in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, and died 11 January 1849 in Martinsburg, Blair, Pennsylvania. He married Mary Kline.
  7. James Nelson “J.N.” Meteer (Mateer) born 1791 in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, and died 14 September 1848 in Franklin County, Ohio, and married Parthena McMurtry Everett, the daughter of Abel Johnson Everitt and Bridget McMurty. They are actress Carole Lombard’s direct ancestors.

My sister, my niece, my Kennedy 2nd cousin, and I all have numerous DNA matches to the descendants of all the siblings listed above except Joseph M. Mateer. There is a strong kinship, not just because of DNA, but also other family connections, like Isabella Meteer, her husband Robert Work, and their children all came to Perry County, Ohio then migrated to neighboring Fairfield County, Ohio. They came to Ohio first, but her brother Robert Meteer and wife Esther Chambers and their children followed them to Perry County, Ohio. Also, her niece, a daughter of Robert Meteer and Esther Chambers, Dorcas Meteer, married James M. Work, the son of Aaron Work and Millicent Everett. James M. Work was a nephew to Robert Work who married Isabella Meteer. Dorcas Meteer Work lived near her Aunt Isabella Meteer Work in Fairfield County, Ohio.

The next generation down. Children of my direct ancestors Robert Meteer and Esther Chambers:

  1. Mary A. Meteer (Mateer) born 22 September 1819 in Pennsylvania, and died 4 April 1905 in Columbus, Franklin, Ohio. She married on 30 June 1840 in Perry County, Ohio to John Baird, as his second wife.
  2. Chambers Meteer born 26 November 1820 Centre County, Pennsylvania, and died 12 August 1823 in Centre County, Pennsylvania.
  3. Julia Ann Meteer (Mateer) born 25 September 1822 in Centre County, Pennsylvania, and died 4 March 1896 in Maxville, Perry County, Ohio of Paralysis. She married on 29 October 1840 in Perry County, Ohio to James Price, the son of John Price and Nancy Albert. (My great-great grandparent).
  4. Elizabeth Meteer born 24 December 1824 in Centre County, Pennsylvania, and died 3 October 1893 in Bremen, Fairfield County, Ohio. She never married.
  5. Jane Meteer born 10 February 1827 in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, and died 28 October 1890 in Bremen, Fairfield County, Ohio. She never married.
  6. Dorcas Meteer born 11 July 1833 in Monday Creek, Perry County, Ohio, and died 11 June 1895 in Fairfield County, Ohio. She married 26 October 1865 in either Perry or Fairfield Counties Ohio to James M. Work, as his second wife. 
Actress Carole Lombard.

Actress Carole Lombard (born Jane Alice Peters) is a descendant of James Mateer and Elizabeth Nelson via their son James Nelson Meteer. My grandmother and Carole Lombard’s mother were direct 3rd Cousins. Please see my blog post: My Cousin Carole Lombard. Our shared Mateer/Meteer Ancestors for more information about her and her direct Meteer/Mateer family lines.

Is this my final word on my McTeer/Mateer lines? No, probably not! But it is the best hypothesis based on currently available records and DNA matches.

References:

  1. Kilkeel, Down, Northern Ireland. Britannica.com
  2. “Kilkeel”IreAtlas Townlands Database
  3. Kilkeel Harbour”eOceanic.com
  4. “Census 2011 Population Statistics for Kilkeel Settlement”Northern Ireland
  5. Kilkeel – Wikipedia.com
  6. James McTeer. Findagrave.com
  7. Silver Spring Presbyterian Church a new start for early settlers By Stephanie Kalina-Metzger, For The Sentinel. Nov 3, 2014 via Wayback Machine.
  8. James McTeer. smokykin.com
  9. McTeer – Mateer Families of Cumberland County Pennsylvania, Frances Davis McTeer, 1975, p. 7, 23-26.

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

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My Ancestor Richard Taylor, the Tailor! 52 Ancestors, Week 20: Textile.

Colonial Tailor. Living history museum in Colonial Williamsburg.
Photograph by Rob Weisman

What came to my mind immediately when I read this week’s prompt was several of my ancestors with occupations directly related to wool, including my quite successful Trowbridge and Cogswell ancestors that were identified with the woolen trade and manufacturing. But after thinking about it, I decided to keep it simple this week and write about my ancestor Richard Taylor, who was a tailor!

We are lucky enough to know his occupation because he was called Richard Taylor “the tailor” due to his occupation and also to differentiate him from another man of the same name, Richard Taylor “of the Rock”, who was also living in Yarmouth in the Plymouth Colony in British Colonial America.

Not much is known about his life prior to coming to America, other than he was born in England. He married Mary Wheldon, daughter of Gabriel Wheldon. The other Richard of Yarmouth, Richard Taylor “of the Rock” married her sister Ruth Wheldon.

To learn more about Mary Wheldon, please read my other blog post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. Week 8: Courting. My Ancestor Mary Wheldon Taylor. Her Life and Death.

Meaning and history of the name Taylor. Taylor is an English surname. It is derived from Old French tailleur meaning tailor, ultimately from Latin taliare meaning to cut. (1) We can deduce that my Richard Taylor came from a long line of tailors, given the meaning of his surname.

So, what would my ancestor Richard Taylor “the Tailor” actually do working as a tailor in British Colonial America? The tailors of colonial times made custom clothing of all types for both men and women. Almost everyone needed the services of a tailor. Most tailors were men, but there are some instances of women being tailors, and while tailors made clothing for women including riding habits; stays; hoops; and cloaks, most of their money was made by making items for men including greatcoats (a large overcoat); cloaks; robes; breeches; and sherryvalleys which were worn on the legs over breeches to protect their clothing. Tailors generally did not carry or sell cloth or ready-made clothing. Their customers would buy the cloth elsewhere and bring it to the tailor for the clothing to be made. (2 & 3)

So, what were sherryvallies exactly? They were thick, loose riding-trousers, fastened on the outside of each leg. They could be trousers or overalls and made of heavy linen, cotton or even leather, they buttoned on the outside of each leg. They were worn over breeches and stockings to protect these clothes from dust and mud encountered when horseback riding. It also protected the clothing from the smell of leather and horse. Similar to an overcoat, it would be removed once the rider arrived at their destination. Sherryvallies were worn by both the well-to-do and the poor. (4 & 5) They remind me of chaps worn by cowboys and ranchers.

A tailor in Colonial America would have made clothes for both the rich and the poor. The difference in the clothing would have been the quality of the fabric.

All tailors worked by hand.  To be successful, a tailor in British Colonial America had to be good with their hands, have good math skills, and be familiar with European fashion trends. They had to be detail oriented. They also worked closely with people and needed good customer service skills, including friendliness and being trustworthy. (2)

References:

  1. Meaning of Taylor Surname. behindthename.com
  2. Colonial Jobs: Tailor.
  3. Colonial America Jobs, Trades, and Occupations
  4. Sherryvallies: Definition. Webster Dictionary and Wiktionary.
  5. Keeping Georgian Gentleman Neat: Sherryvalleys. Two Nerdy History Girls

If you’d like to learn more about the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks project, please visit here:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

Or join the Facebook group Generations Cafe.

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

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My Cousin Carole Lombard. Our shared Mateer/Meteer Ancestors.

The beautiful Carole Lombard.

Carole Lombard was an American movie actress who became one of the highest paid stars of the 1930s. She is probably best known for starring in comedies and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in the film My Man Godfrey. She was married to actors William Powell and Clark Gable. She and her mother died in a plane crash in 1942 while returning from a tour to sell war bonds. Their DC3 crashed into Mount Potosi in Nevada on a clear night apparently due to a navigation error. (1 & 3)

Born Jane Alice Peters on Oct 6, 1908, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Her parents were Frederick Christian Peters and Elizabeth Jane Knight. Her paternal grandfather, John Claus Peters, was the son of German immigrants, Claus Peters and Caroline Catherine Eberlin. On her mother’s side, she was a descendant of Thomas Hastings who came from the East Anglia region of England to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. (2)

On her maternal side she was also a descendant of James Meteer (Mateer) and Elizabeth Nelson.

I love this photo of Carole Lombard. Old Hollywood glamour at its best!

Lombard was the youngest of three children, having two older brothers. She spent her early childhood in a sprawling, two-story house at 704 Rockhill Street in Fort Wayne, near the St. Mary’s River. Her father had been injured during his early life and was left with constant headaches which caused him to burst out in paroxysms of anger which disturbed the family. Her parents divorced and her mother took the three children to Los Angeles in 1914. (2)

Jane Alice Peters, the future Carole Lombard, with her mother and two older brothers. Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Her career spanned from the silent era to “talkies.” An auto accident almost ended her life as well as acting by inflicting serious scars on her face. Undaunted, she was able to cover the blemishes with the heavy use of cosmetics. She received her only Oscar nomination for Best Actress in My Man Godfrey. No Man of Her Own put her opposite Clark Gable for the first and only time but their marriage was still seven years away when they became the ideal Hollywood couple known for their success in the film industry. (1 & 3)

Carole Lombard and William Powell were married for 2 years. They dated for 8 months after getting together in Oct 1930 and they married on June 26, 1931. Two years later they divorced on August 16, 1933. although they remained very good friends until the end of Lombard’s life. At the time, she blamed it on their careers, but in a 1936 interview, she admitted that this “had little to do with the divorce. We were just two completely incompatible people”. (3, 6, & 7)

She did not see her final movie To Be or Not to Be released. With World War II raging in 1942, Clark Gable journeyed to Nevada to join a search party seeking the wreckage of a TWA twin engine DC-3 airliner flying from Indianapolis to Los Angeles. Aboard were 22 passengers including Carole Lombard Gable and her mother. She had finished a war bond drive just before boarding. There were no survivors. The blonde film star of the 1930s best remembered for her “Screw Ball comedies” was gone. Clark Gable rode on the train that carried the bodies of his wife and mother-in-law back to Los Angeles. She had left specific instructions for her burial in the event of death. Clark Gable purchased three crypts at Forest Lawn Cemetery, one for Carole, her mother and a reserve for himself. She mandated a swift, direct interment in a mausoleum crypt at Forest Lawn with only her immediate family present. In the wake of her death at age 33, the Army offered to conduct a military funeral to honor the first star to give her life while aiding the war effort. They were refused and her wishes were carried out as specified. However, a World War II Liberty Ship was christened in her honor. She is interred next to Gable and to her mother, Elizabeth Peters, who also perished in the crash. (1 & 3)

Carole Lombard in Supernatural (1933).

My favorite films of Carole Lombard:

  1. No Man of Her Own (1932). Her only film with Clark Gable.
  2. Supernatural (1933). Her only horror film. One of her stranger roles, but I love it!
  3. The Princess Comes Across (1936). She is paired with Fred MacMurray in this one, it is a mystery/comedy.
  4. Nothing Sacred (1937). A fun screwball comedy. Her only film in Technicolor.
  5. In Name Only (1939). A romantic film also starring another of my favorites Cary Grant along with Kay Francis.
  6. Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941). Another fun screwball comedy film. But directed by one of my all-time favorite directors, Alfred Hitchcock.
Carole Lombard.

Fun fact: when the filming of No Man of Her Own concluded, on the last day of filming, Gable presented Lombard with a pair of ballerina slippers with a card attached that said, “To a true primadonna.” Lombard got him back when she presented him with a large ham with his picture on it. Gable kissed her goodbye, and they did not stay in touch, as Gable found Lombard to be bawdier than he was willing to handle, and Lombard found Gable to be overly conceited. It was not until four years later that their romance began to take off. Gable and Lombard never appeared together in another film, primarily because they became major stars at different studios, which didn’t like to lend them out. (3 & 4)

Carole Lombard with husband William Powell.

Famous Kin:

Carole Lombard is the only famous descendant of the Meteer ancestors that we share.

Carole Lombard and my Mom were direct 4th cousins. Carole Lombard’s mother, Elizabeth Jane Knight Peters, and my grandmother, Glenna Annette Kennedy Cole, were direct 3rd cousins.

Our shared ancestors are James Meteer (Mateer) and Elizabeth Nelson.

Carole Lombard with husband Clark Gable.

Our shared ancestor James Meteer (Mateer) was born about 1755 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He died 23 May 1832 in Union Township, Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. He married Elizabeth Nelson. She was born 22 Apr. 1769 in Rye, Pennsylvania. She died 25 Sept 1804 in Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Robert Nelson. They married 17 Feb 1780 in East Pennsboro, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. The surname is found various ways in addition to Meteer and Mateer, including Matier, Mintre, Minater, Mintier.

Marriages of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania from 1749-1783.

Proven children of James Meteer (Mateer) and Elizabeth Nelson:

  1. Robert Meteer (Mateer) born 25 Oct 1781 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. He died 6 Dec 1849 in Monday Creek, Perry County, Ohio. He married Esther Chambers on 11 Dec 1817 in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania. She was born 25 July 1790 in Centre County, Pennsylvania and died 16 July 1876 in Monday Creek, Perry County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Pvt. Elijah Chambers and Mary Linaberry (Lindaberry). They are my direct ancestors.
  2. William Mateer born about 1783 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died before 1870 in Clarion, Clarion, Pennsylvania. He married Eliza Eskill, and Martha Donnelly.
  3. Isabelle (Isabella) Meteer born 12 June 1784 in Pennsylvania, and died 25 October 1860 in Fairfield County, Ohio. She married Robert Work.
  4. Dorcas Mateer born about 1785 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died 1825 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania. It appears she never married.
  5. Jennet (Jennette) Mateer/Meteer born 1786 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and died 1 January 1861 in Mahoning County, Ohio. She married William Steele. (She passed on the maiden name of her mother Nelson as a first name of her son).
  6. Joseph M. Mateer born 1789 in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, and died 11 January 1849 in Martinsburg, Blair, Pennsylvania. He married Mary Kline.
  7. James Nelson “J.N.” Meteer (Mateer) born 1791 in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, and died 14 September 1848 in Franklin County, Ohio, and married Parthena McMurtry Everett, the daughter of Abel Johnson Everitt and Bridget McMurty. They are actress Carole Lombard’s direct ancestors.
James Nelson Meteer/Mateer and wife Parthena McMurtry Everett. Ancestors of Carole Lombard.

My sister Linda, my niece Elisabeth (daughter of my brother Bob), and my Kennedy 2nd cousin (who also shares my Price/Meteer ancestors), and me, all have numerous DNA matches to the descendants of the siblings of Robert Meteer listed above except Joseph M. Mateer.

Our original immigrant ancestor was James McTeer (Mateer) who was from Kilkeel, County Down, Ireland, and settled in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania. Please see this blog post for more information about my immigrant ancestor James McTeer (Mateer).

Carole Lombard’s direct line:

  1. James Meteer (Mateer) and Elizabeth Nelson.
  2. James Nelson Meteer and Parthena McMurtry Everett.
  3. Elizabeth Jane Meteer and Willard M. Knight.
  4. Charles Stuart Knight and Alice S. Cheney.
  5. Elizabeth Jane Knight and Frederick Christian Peters.
  6. Jane Alice Peters (Carole Lombard).
A publicity still from her film Supernatural (1933).

My direct line:

  1. James Meteer (Mateer) and Elizabeth Nelson.
  2. Robert Meteer and Esther Chambers.
  3. Julia Ann Meteer (Mateer) and James Price.
  4. Mary Elizabeth Price and Abraham G. Kennedy.
  5. Glenna Annette Kennedy and Durward Edward Cole. (My maternal grandparents).

My Mom would have loved knowing about this family connection with Carole Lombard. She loved old movies and named my sister Linda after actress Linda Darnell.

Carole Lombard and Cary Grant in In Name Only (1939).

References:

  1. Carole Lombard. Britannica.com
  2. Carole Lombard. Walkoffame.com
  3. Carole Lombard. Wikipedia.
  4. Nixon, Rob “No Man of Her Own” (TCM article)
  5. No Man of Her Own (1932). Wikipedia.
  6. Gehring, Wes D. (2003). Carole Lombard: The Hoosier Tornado. Indianapolis, Indiana: Indiana Historical Society Press.
  7. Ott, Frederick W. (1972). The Films of Carole Lombard. Secaucus, New Jersey: Citadel Press.

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

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My Immigrant Ancestor Daniel Strang, Sr. – A Frenchman Who Could NOT Make a Tasty Fricassee!

This week’s writing prompt for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks is Food and Drink. I immediately thought of my ancestor Daniel Strang, Sr! Evidently, according to Madam Knight of Boston, he may have owned an inn and tavern in Rye, Westchester County, New York, and offered his services as a cook to his guests, but he was a terrible cook! She requested he make her a fricassee, and in her opinion, as she states, “I desired a fricasee, which the Frenchman undertakeing mannaged so contrary to my notion of cookery, that I hastned to bed superless…” Her full review of her night spent at his inn is included below.

A bit about his tavern and inn, and Madam Knight’s review, from the book Chronicle of a Border Town: History of Rye, Westchester County, New York:

In the village itself, ‘Strang’s tavern’ was the ancient public house. A portion of the original building still standing on the southeast corner of the post-road and Rectory street.

A pencil drawing of Strang’s Tavern and Inn

Madam Knight of Boston gives an amusing description of her entertainment at this inn, in the course of her journey on horseback in 1704 from that city to New York: —

‘From Norowalk we hasted towards Rye, walking and leading our horses near a mile together, up a prodigious high hill; and so riding till about nine at night ; and there arrived and took up our lodgings at an ordinary inn a French family kept. Here being very hungry, I desired a fricasee, which the Frenchman undertakeing mannaged so contrary to my notion of cookery, that I hastned to bed superless : being shewd the way up the pair of stairs which had such a narrow passage that I had almost stopt by the bulk of my body. But arriving at my apartment found it to be a little Lento chamber, furnisht amongst other rubbish with a high bedd and a low one, a long table, a bench and a bottomless chair. . . . My poor bones compalined bitterly, not being used to such lodgings ; and so did the man who was with us ; and poor I made but one grone, which was from the time I went to bed to the time I riss, which was about three in the morning. Setting up by the fire till light, and having discharged our ordinary, which was as dear as if we had had far better fare, we took our leave of Monsier, and about seven in the morn came to New Rochell, a French town, where we had a good breakfast, and in the strength of that, about an how’r before sunsett, got to York.’ (1)

So, what exactly is a fricassee? It is a stew made with pieces of meat that have been browned in butter that are served in a sauce flavored with the cooking stock. Fricassee is usually made with chicken, veal or rabbit, with variations limited only by what ingredients the cook has at hand. (2, 3, & 4)

History of fricassee: by the general description of frying and then braising in liquid, there are recipes for fricassee as far back as the earliest version of the medieval French cookbook Le Viandier, circa 1300. In 1490, it is first referred to specifically as “friquassée” in the print edition of Le Viandier. (4 & 6)

Below you will find a recipe for Brown Fricassee Rabbit Recipe from the 1700’s, it is a brown fricassee and comes from The Art of Cookery by Hannah Glasse. The original book was published in 1747 (5) and gives you an idea of the types of ingredients used at the time. Rabbit meat would have been readily available for him to use, although often fricassee is made from chicken and in that case would be a white fricassee.

Ingredients

  • Rabbit meat
  • Three eggs
  • Breadcrumbs.
  • Nutmeg.
  • Mace spice.
  • Butter.
  • Gravy.
  • Wine.
  • Mushrooms.

Here is the video on how to cook the brown fricassee rabbit.

A bit about Daniel Streing/Strang, Sr., he was born in 1655 in Gien, Loiret, France. (Gien is on the Loire River and is 50 miles from Orléans). He was the son of Henri Strengs / Strangs / Lestrange and Marie Babault. His family were French Huguenots. He married Charlotte Marie Lemaistre on 21 August 1680 at The Chateau de Chamerolles, at Lorret, France, it was one of the few churches where Protestants of Huguenot or similar descent were able to marry. Their first child was born in France. The remainder of their children were born in America.

If you’d like to read more about his life and upbringing in France, time spent in England, as well as his life in America, and details about his wife’s family, and their descendants, see my full blog post about them here: Daniel Streing / Strang, Sr. and Charlotte Marie Lemaistre – My first confirmed French Ancestors.

References:

  1. Baird, Charles Washington. (1871). Chronicle of a Border Town: History of Rye, Westchester County, New York, 1660-1870, Including Harrison and the White Plains Till 1788. New York, NY: Anson D. F. Randolph and Company.
  2. “Fricassee | Lexico.com (Oxford Dictionary)”Lexico Dictionaries | English.
  3. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Comfort Food. Penguin. 2007. p. 108
  4. Fricassee. Wikipedia.com
  5. Brown Fricassee Rabbit Recipe from the 1700’s – Kevin Felts. January 16, 2018.
  6. Hess, Karen (1996). Martha Washington’s Booke of Cookery. Columbia University Press. p. 41.

If you’d like to learn more about the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks project, please visit here:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

Or join the Facebook group Generations Cafe.

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

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52 Ancestors, Week 15. How Do You Spell That? My 2nd Great-Grandfather Elias “Eli” Nutick.

My great-grandmother Alice Elizabeth Nutick Armstrong. Daughter of Elias “Eli” Nutick & Margaret (Margarthe) Weiss.

The surname, parentage, and links back to his homeland of my great-great grandfather Elias “Eli” Nutick have been quite evasive. His line has been a royal headache and a never-ending brick wall for decades! Now, his wife, my great-great grandmother Margaret (Margarthe) Weiss’ line has been a dream to research. I have many DNA matches related to her Weiss/Fried/Propheter and other ancestors, all found in and around Klingenmünster, Germany. You can learn more about her family here: My Weiss, Fried, Propheter, and Related Ancestors from Klingenmünster, Germany

I have thought I found Nutick related kin via DNA a few times, only to discover if I went back far enough, the links were actually to his wife’s ancestors and not to him. I thought I really had it figured out when I had a few distant DNA matches that had the surnames Emig/Emich in their tree that went back to Germany, and those surnames were a good possible fit for Nutick, but alas, my connections to them are not on this line after all.

A little background on what is known about Eli Nutick. According to the two census records he appears in; he was either born about 1842 (according to the 1870 US Federal Census) or was born about 1816 (according to the 1880 Census). He dies in 1887, leaving his wife a widow with several young children. I tend to lean toward him being older and thus why he died thirty-two years before his wife. In the 1870 Census he states he was born in Bavaria. His wife also states she was born in Bavaria. This actually was of no help in researching their families because what was the Kingdom of Bavaria and what is now Bavaria is not one in the same and where she was born in Klingenmünster was sometimes listed as part of Bavaria, it is actually in the Rhineland-Palatinate. In the 1880 Census he lists himself (and his parents) as born in Prussia, as does his wife. Once again, this is not of much help, for the Kingdom of Prussia and what has been considered part of Prussia has changed over time in history, depending on the time period we are discussing. Later, his wife as a widow just lists her place of birth (and that of her parents) as Germany.

In the two census records where he appears as well as various other records, his surname is spelled as Ottic/Otte/Udig/Utic/Udie. But today I discovered his marriage record. I only found it by removing his surname from the parameters and only listing his first name and the name of his bride, Margaret Weiss. And guess what? His name is quite clearly listed as Elias Wegt!!!!!! This explains so much.

Marriage record in Hamilton County, Ohio for Elias Wegt and Margaret Weis.

The story that was told to me by an older Nutick family member in the 1980’s was that when Eli’s children went to grade school, the non-German speaking teacher in Ohio told them their name was Nutick from then on, because that is what she heard when they said their last name! Prior to the 1900 Census the name is listed as Ottic/Otte/Udig/Utic/Udie, and various other ways! I have no idea how Wegt (Weigt) sounded like Ottic/Otte/Udig/Utic/Udie, etc… to the census takers or why the teacher heard the name as Nutick. But once I understood his name was originally Wegt, I found DNA matches to a Wegt/Weigt family from Rawitsch, Posen – which was at the time part of the Kingdom of Prussia but is now in Poland.

At this time, my ancestor Elias “Eli” Wegt Nutick appears to be the son of Samuel Weigt (the son of Johann Gottfried Weigt) and Marie Elisabeth Kubal/Kubala (the daughter of Johannes Wojciech Kubal). And he had at least one brother named Christoph Christian Weigt (Weicht). His brother migrated from Poland to Volhynia which is in Ukraine (in what was part of Russia at the time) before at least one of his sons immigrated to America. The DNA matches are still not as abundant in comparison to his wife’s family lines, but the DNA links are not as opaque as they were prior to discovering his marriage record.

The marriage record of his parents is thought to be found in Piaski, Gostyń County, Poland which is 26 miles from Rawitsch. There are still volunteers entering the marriage records from Posen into a database for genealogists to use. Not all of the records from the Posen area have been entered yet.

Regarding his brother’s migrating to Volhynia, this article discusses The Germans from Volhynia and Russian Poland. Many went to Alberta, Canada.

So, are we Polish?!!! Well, yes, and kind of! Where our ancestors came from is now part of Poland. And the surname Kubal, although not a super common surname, is found most often in Poland. Johannes Wojceich Kubel had a Polish name. Wojceich is very much a Polish given name. It is the equivalent to the Czech name Vojtěch, Slovak Vojtech, and German Woitke. The name is formed from two components in archaic Polish: wój (Slavic: voj), a root pertaining to war. It also forms words like wojownik (“warrior”) and wojna (“war”). (1) So, it would appear that at least one of our ancestors, the Kubal/Kubala line, does have Polish origins.

Fun little side note here: when I was about 13 years old, I had several people ask me if I was Polish! Why several people thought I had Polish ancestry is still a mystery. But I suppose I could look at least partly of Polish ancestry.

I only know how to say a few sentences in Polish, but I will have to learn a bit more on Duolingo! And I absolutely love the Polish saying “Nie mój cyrk, nie moje małpy”, which translates literally to “Not my circus, not my monkey.”

🇵🇱 Cieszę się, że mam polskiego przodka! 💖

The surname Kubel has a few origins, it could be from the German surname Kuebel that is generally thought to come from the Middle High German word “kübel” meaning a “vat,” or “barrel.” As such it was an occupational name for a cooper, or barrel maker. (4) But since he has a Polish given name of Wojciech, and the family lived in what is now Poland, it could also be from the surname Kubal. Kubal name meaning: Polish, Czech, Slovak, and German: from a derivative of Kuba, a pet form of the personal name Jakub. (5) As a Polish surname Kubal, it would have been also listed as Kubalska/Kubalski. In Polish naming the ending is ‘ski’ when it’s a male and ‘ska’ when it’s a female.

Weigt is a German surname, although found to a lesser degree in Poland. Johann Gottfreid Weigt is thought to be the son of Johann George Weigt and Rosina Elisabeth Krisch. Weigt is a German surname thought to be a reduced form of name Weigand. Weigand means “son of Wigant.” Wigant is a personal name derived from the Old High German word “wigant,” meaning “warrior.” (3) Krisch is a name most often associated with Austria. It is a German, English and French surname originally derived from the Old French given name Chistian and rendered in medieval documents in the Latin form Christianus meaning ‘follower of Christ’. (2)

Is this my last word on our Nutick line? Probably not! But it does seem to be forming into a much more coherent supposition as to the roots of my great-great grandfather Elias “Eli” Wegt Nutick.

Polish folk art.

References:

  1. Wojciech Name Meaning
  2. Krisch Surname Meaning
  3. Weigand Surname History
  4. Meaning of German Surname Kuebel
  5. Kubal Family History – Kubal Name Meaning

Just for fun:

Polish for Indo-Europeans Beginners Course

“Not my circus, not my monkey.”

If you’d like to learn more about the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks project, please visit here:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

Or join the Facebook group Generations Cafe.

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

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52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks. Week 14: Check it Out! My Ancestor Rev. Thomas Shepard.

The writing prompt for this week is “Check it Out!” There are a few ways to take this, as in sharing something cool or neat, or something to do with libraries and books. I was inspired to write about my ancestor Rev. Thomas Shepard. His works are available at several brick-and-mortar public libraries and also in university libraries including Harvard University, due to my ancestor’s close historical connections with this university and with Cambridge, Massachusetts. Thanks to Google Books, the online library of today, and the Internet Archive, I will be able to share links to his works that you can read online for free.

The photo to the left of my ancestor is from a t-shirt available with his image from mediagratiae from their Puritan Collection! There does survive a sketch of my ancestor done in his lifetime, and the image is based on that sketch. I thought that was kind of cool, so check that out too! 😎

I have written about my ancestor in a prior blog entry I wrote last August in celebration of the 372nd anniversary of the death of my quite interesting and significant ancestor Rev. Thomas Shepard. That entry includes detailed biographical information about him, his life in England and America, his marriages, his descendants (including some famous ones!), and his religious and spiritual journey. To learn more about Rev. Thomas Shepard please read My Ancestor Rev. Thomas Shepard, an English and American Puritan Minister and Significant Figure in Early Colonial New England.

From The Works of Thomas Shepard re: the beliefs of the Puritans.

I often wonder what my ancestor would think of me, his eighth-great granddaughter. A cradle Roman Catholic who is also a student at Phillips Theological Seminary. If you read above what the Puritans believed, then no doubt my ancestor would have thought me a Papist in need of saving! Would he find my theological writings fascinating and sound? Would he even entertain reading my writings? I am guessing not. For not everyone had rights in Colonial New England. It’s no secret that the villages and towns were run by men and women had little rights if any at all. They weren’t permitted to attend town meetings and didn’t have any power in church decisions. The minister and church supported this concept as well, claiming that the soul consisted of two halves – an immortal half, which was the ‘masculine’ half, and the mortal half, which was the ‘feminine’ half. This belief extended even to childbirth, where it was believed that a woman would have a nice rosy complexion should she be pregnant with a boy, and a pale complexion should she be having a girl. (3) Just some things to ponder. 😮 But I would like to think I inherited my intellect and passion for learning from him and many other ancestors including those not as well known that were also ministers, as well as teachers, school principals, coopers, weavers, farmers, merchants, auctioneers, tailors, innkeepers (tavern keepers), vinedressers, blacksmiths, cobblers, milliners, dressmakers, and much more.

The first of his writings that I want to share that is available at Google Books is The Works of Thomas Shepard, First Pastor of The First Church, Cambridge, Mass. with a Memoir of his Life and Character. Published in 1853 from a copy at the Harvard College Library. Many of the works included are also available for stand-alone reading including The Sincere Convert.

The Works of Thomas Shepard, First Pastor of The First Church, Cambridge, Massachusetts “has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.” (1) This work is in the public domain in the United States of America.

Cover of the book The Parable of the Ten Virgins by Thomas Shepard.

The next work I want to share is The Parable of the Ten Virgins by Thomas Shepard. It is not found in The Works of Thomas Shepard sited above. The entire book can be found to read online via the Internet Archive: The Parable of the Ten Virgins by Thomas Shepard. This digital copy was sponsored by the Boston Public Library.

Partial review of the book:

Jesus Christ relentlessly divides the world into two. There are houses built on a rock, and on sand. There are sheep, and there are goats. There is wheat and there are tares. There are trees that bear fruit, and there are thorns and thistles. And, according to Jesus in Matthew chapter 25, there are wise virgins, and there are foolish virgins; and the one you are making all the difference here now, and in eternity.

At first, the size of the book and the language both make it appear that reading it may seem like a burdensome task, but I would like to propose that it shouldn’t be. Dr. John Gerstner in the foreword says, “Don’t read it. Study it, a few pages at a time; decipher it… It may not save you, but it will leave you in no doubt if you are saved, and even less if you are not!” We ought not try to just read through The Parable of The Ten Virgins. When your motive is to finish the book rather than understand it—it does become burdensome. But if your motive is to learn from the faithful expositions of God’s Word, and if your motive is to have assurance about the things of God, and if your motive is to fight to enjoy Christ here and to be prepared in the hereafter then this book is not a burden; it’s a blessing.

The book is a collection of Shepard’s sermon notes on the Parable of The Ten Virgins found in Matthew 25:1-13. He takes you verses by verse, sentence by sentence, and word by word. Though the work is a little over six-hundred pages, Shepard does not repeat himself. The points of doctrine always seem reasonable, and are never forced. It is never boring, especially when you realize his sermons are directed to you.

The Parable of the Ten Virgins is a parable that covers much of the Christian life. This is precisely the reason why Shepard has written so much concerning it. It affects how we view the church, sin, wasting our time, and assurance of salvation. It affects how we view the most important of things. (2) – Taken from a review of the book by Chadd Sheffield.

Theses Sabbaticæ. Or, The Doctrine of the Sabbath – by Rev. Thomas Shepard. This sold at auction with Sothebys for $2,772 US! It was published in 1649.

References:

  1. Books A Million.com – The Works of Thomas-Shepard
  2. Book Review: Parable of the Ten Virgins–Thomas Shepard by Chadd Sheffield. WordPress.com
  3. This Is What It Was Like to Be a Puritan During Colonial Times in New England – During a time when the separation of church and state was far from anyone’s minds, Puritan life was physically healthier but mentally taxing. By Katie Machado. 6 October 2020.

If you’d like to learn more about the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks project, please visit here:

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

Or join the Facebook group Generations Cafe.

If you use any information from my blog posts as a reference or source, please give credit and provide a link back to my work that you are referencing. Unless otherwise noted, my work is © Anna A. Kasper 2011-2022. All rights reserved. Thank you.

Posted in 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Bible Study, Famous Kin, Genealogy, Religious, Theology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments